Anthony Pateras

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Anthony Pateras
Pateras, Live at Strom, Munich, 2018
Pateras, Live at Strom, Munich, 2018
Background information
Birth nameAnthony Peter Pateras
Born1979 (age 40–41)
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Genres
Occupation(s)
  • Musician
  • composer
  • producer
  • conductor
Instruments
Years active1999–present
Labels
Associated acts
Websiteanthonypateras.com

Anthony Peter Pateras (born 1979) is an Australian-born composer, pianist and electronic musician. At the APRA Music Awards' Art Music Awards, he has been nominated three times: 2011 for Performance of the Year for his composition, Refractions, performed by Clocked Out and Speak Percussion; 2012 for Work of the Year – Instrumental for Flesh and Ghost performed by Speak Percussion; and 2015 for Performance of the Year for Beauty Will Be Amnesiac or Will not Be at All performed by Synergy Percussion.

Career[edit]

Anthony Peter Pateras was born in 1979 and grew up in Melbourne.[1][2][3] As an undergraduate he scored numerous theatrical productions at La Mama, The Carlton Courthouse and LaTrobe Student Theatre. He was a sound composer for a play, Carboni, written by John Romeril and performed in June 1999 at the Carlton Courthouse.[4] For William 37 (November–December 2001) at La Mama, Pateras worked with Jeremy Collings on the soundscape, which Kate Herbert of The Herald Sun reviewed, "[it] has some appropriate and interesting moments but is often too loud, intrusive and poorly placed."[5]

From 2001 till 2006 he scored numerous short films, two were accepted in the Cinéfondation section at the Cannes Film Festival: Martin Four (2001) and Footnote (2004).[6] He curated the Articulating Space concert series from 2001, which later transformed into the Melbourne International Biennale of Exploratory Music in 2008.[7][8] In May 2003 he collaborated with Australian electro-acoustic improviser and composer, Robin Fox, to release the duo album, Coagulate, which AllMusic's François Couture described, "[it] is blatantly maximalist: loud, occasionally harsh, very in-your-face and occasionally quite entertaining."[9]

Robin Fox (at left) and Anthony Pateras (right), Toff in the Town, July 2008

Pateras' solo album, Mutant Theatre (January 2004), was rated by AllMusic's staff writer as three-and-a-half stars out-of five.[10] For the recording he composed the tracks, provided piano, prepared piano and vocals, and conducted the session musicians as well as co-producing the work.[10] Pateras and Fox' second collaborative album, Flux Compendium (March 2006), had Couture observe, "the two electronicians toned down the harsh noise in favor of a more discreet – and intriguing – sound palette. It seems these two can build impromptu compositions out of any type of sound: breath, belches, coins, laughs, doors, and yes, even pure electronic tones."[11] Also in that year, Gauticle, an album was released by Pateras joined by Sean Baxter on drums and David Brown on guitar, which had been recorded two years earlier.[12] Couture noticed, "[they] play their instruments in unorthodox ways, looking for quiet, delicate sounds. Pateras spends most of his time inside the piano, hitting, scraping, and rubbing its strings."[12]

Chromatophore (September 2008), his next solo album, was rated at three stars out-of five, with Couture explaining, "there is no real theme, genre, form, or instrumentation running through the six works... except [his] creativity and broad palette."[13] He provided computers, electronics, prepared piano, synthesiser and vocals whilst also working as conductor and producer.[13] His third collaboration with Fox, End of Daze, followed in January of the next year, which Couture felt was, "chock-full of exciting experimental music, and nicely sequenced into a fun yet challenging listen... Samples and glitches are digitally treated and combined on the fly to produce fast-paced pieces that stand somewhere between sound collage and digital noise music."[14]

Pateras composed and conducted a performance, Percussion Portrait, which brought together two groups: Speak Percussion (Nat Grant, Peter Neville, Matthias Schack-Arnott, Eugene Ughetti) from Melbourne and Clocked Out (Nozomi Omote, Vanessa Tomlinson) from Brisbane.[15] Steven Hodgson of Australian Music Centre reviewed the event and described the last part, Refractions (2008), "[it is] highly sectionalised, progressing from texture to texture with a continued sense that pitch and rhythmic materials have been selected to serve the instrumental combination in use at any particular time. The work features a variety of non-conventional percussive sounds, amongst them the crinkling of lolly wrappers, the rattling of keys, and rice poured onto the skins of bass and timpani drums."[15] At the APRA Music Awards of 2011 his composition, Refractions, was nominated for Art Music Award for Performance of the Year as delivered by Clocked Out and Speak Percussion.[16]

In March 2012 he performed Ontetradecagon – his interpretation of jazz musician, Miles Davis' work – at the Adelaide Festival, with a 14-piece ensemble.[17] The ensemble performed it live-in-the-studio for Andrew Ford's The Music Show on Radio National.[17] At the APRA Music Awards of 2012 he was nominated for Art Music Award for Work of the Year – Instrumental for Flesh and Ghost, which was performed by Speak Percussion in September 2011.[18] The judging panel described Flesh and Ghost, as "a wonderfully epic piece where the composer utilises the 12-player percussion ensemble beautifully, creating a one sound world and a lovely sense of texture. It has a sense of space with spectrums of sound."[19] At the APRA Music Awards of 2015 he was nominated for Art Music Award: Performance of the Year for Beauty Will Be Amnesiac or Will not Be at All, which was performed by Synergy Percussion.[20] The work was commissioned by Sydney-based ensemble, Synergy Percussion, for their 40th anniversary celebration.[21]

Pateras performing live, Melbourne, March 2012

Pateras collaborated with Mike Patton (of Faith No More) to establish their tētēma project: they released an album, Geocidal, late in 2014.[22] Danny Baraz of Janky Smooth felt it was, "nothing short of an abstract, conceptual masterpiece. There are no hooks here. This will receive no radio play – except, possibly from the least commercial, college radio stations."[23] In 2016 the BBC Symphony Orchestra performed Pateras' composition, Immediata, under Brett Dean with Thomas Gould as soloist and Pateras on revox.[24] The following year the tētēma project headlined the MONA FOMA festival.[25] The second album by the group, Necroscape, appeared in April 2020, with Pop Matters' Justin Vellucci declaring, "[it] is not a record of hits; instead, it unfolds in Bizarro chapters as a catalog of misses... [they] flesh out some interesting sonic touches and have a grasp on ambiance, sure. But, sadly, the compliments have to end there."[26] While the staff writer from Smells Like Infinite Sadness observed, "[it's] very much a challenging listen... but its unique, crazy quilt mix of musical components should be just as engaging for any adventurous listener."[27]

Discography[edit]

List of albums
Title Album details
Coagulate (Anthony Pateras and Robin Fox)
  • Released: May 2003[9]
  • Label: Synaesthesia (SYN 007)
  • Format: CD
Mutant Theatre
Flux Compendium (Anthony Pateras and Robin Fox)
Gauticle (Pateras/Baxter/Brown)
  • Released: April 2006[28]
  • Label: Synaesthesia (019)
  • Format: CD
Chasms
  • Released: 2007[29]
  • Label: SIRR Records (sir 0030)
  • Format: CD
Chromatophore
  • Released: 1 September 2008[13]
  • Label: Tzadzik Records (TZA 8057)
  • Format: CD
End of Daze (Anthony Pateras and Robin Fox)
  • Released: 20 January 2009
  • Label: Editions Mego (DEMEGO 006)
  • Format: CD
Errors of the Human Body OST
  • Released: 12 March 2012[30]
  • Label: Editions Mego (eMEG O140)
  • Note: Soundtrack album
  • Format: CD
Collected Works 2002–2012
  • Released: 30 April 2012[31]
  • Label: Immediata (IMM001)
  • Note: Compilation album
  • Format: 5× CD
Delirioso
  • Released: 18 March 2015[32]
  • Label:
  • Format: Audio Music Recording
Entertainment = Control (Anthony Pateras, Erkki Veltheim)
  • Released: 15 September 2015[33]
  • Label: Immediata (IMM003)
  • Format: CD
Blood Stretched Out
  • Released: 2017[34]
  • Label: Immediata (IMM008)
  • Note: Live album
  • Format: CD

References[edit]

  1. ^ "'Architexture' at APRA search engine". APRA AMCOS (Australasian Performing Right Association, Australasian Mechanical Copyright Owners Society). Retrieved 18 June 2020. Note: For additional work user may have to select 'Search again' and then 'Enter a title:' &/or 'Performer:'
  2. ^ "Notice de personne 'Pateras, Anthony (1979-....)'". BnF Catalogue général - Bibliothèque nationale de France. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
  3. ^ "Episode Three: Anthony Pateras". Set. Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). 16 May 2006.
  4. ^ "Event: Carboni". AusStage. Retrieved 19 June 2020.
  5. ^ Herbert, Kate (23 November 2001). "Theatre Reviews: William 37 by Adam J A Cass". The Herald Sun. p. 91.
  6. ^ "Anthony Pateras". Cannes Film Festival. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
  7. ^ Bates, Nat (1 June 2003). "Sonic show and tell". RealTime (55): 29. Retrieved 22 June 2020.
  8. ^ Rule, Dan (29 March 2008). "Off the beaten track". The Age. Retrieved 22 June 2020.
  9. ^ a b Couture, François. "Coagulate - Robin Fox, Anthony Pateras | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
  10. ^ a b c "Anthony Pateras: Mutant Theatre - Anthony Pateras | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
  11. ^ a b Couture, François. "Flux Compendium - Anthony Pateras | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Retrieved 19 June 2020.
  12. ^ a b Couture, François. "Gauticle - Anthony Pateras | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Retrieved 19 June 2020.
  13. ^ a b c Couture, François. "Anthony Pateras: Chromatophore - Anthony Pateras | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Retrieved 19 June 2020.
  14. ^ Couture, François. "End of Daze - Anthony Pateras | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Retrieved 19 June 2020.
  15. ^ a b Hodgson, Steven (14 July 2009). "Anthony Pateras: Percussion Portrait : Review (Event) Article". Australian Music Centre. Retrieved 20 June 2020.
  16. ^ "Performance of the Year". APRA AMCOS (Australasian Performing Right Association, Australasian Mechanical Copyright Owners Society) | Australian Music Centre (AMC). Archived from the original on 9 August 2011. Retrieved 20 June 2020.
  17. ^ a b Ford, Andrew (3 March 2012). "Anthony Pateras: Pianist, Lover of the Venerable Revox Tape Machine and Composer". The Music Show. ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC)). Retrieved 18 June 2020.
  18. ^ "2012 Work of the Year – Instrumental". APRA AMCOS (Australasian Performing Right Association, Australasian Mechanical Copyright Owners Society) | Australian Music Centre (AMC). Archived from the original on 14 May 2012. Retrieved 20 June 2020.
  19. ^ "2012 Art Music Awards - comments by judging panels : News (AMC) Article". Australian Music Centre (AMC). 4 April 2012. Retrieved 20 June 2020.
  20. ^ "Performance of the Year". APRA AMCOS (Australasian Performing Right Association, Australasian Mechanical Copyright Owners Society) | Australian Music Centre (AMC). 2015. Retrieved 22 June 2020.
  21. ^ "Synergy Percussion turns 40 - Into the Music". ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC)). 16 August 2014. Retrieved 22 June 2020.
  22. ^ Mitchell, Tony (22 February 2015). "Anthony Pateras: 'The Murder of Place' Interview". Cyclic Defrost. Retrieved 23 June 2020.
  23. ^ Baraz, Danny (19 November 2014). "Tetema – Geocidal: A new project by Mike Patton and Anthony Pateras". Janky Smooth. Retrieved 23 June 2020.
  24. ^ "Be in the Audience Brett Dean conducts Brett Dean - BBC Symphony Orchestra". BBC. 1 April 2016. Retrieved 22 June 2020.
  25. ^ Prescott, Shaun (22 January 2017). "Tētēma review – Mike Patton's world premiere at Mofo provokes and delights | Art and design". Guardian Australia. Retrieved 22 June 2020.
  26. ^ Vellucci, Justin (3 April 2020). "tētēma: Necroscape | Music Review". PopMatters. Retrieved 23 June 2020.
  27. ^ "tētēma Necroscape Review". Smells Like Infinite Sadness. 19 April 2020. Retrieved 23 June 2020.
  28. ^ Baker Fish, Bob (26 April 2004). "Pateras, Baxter & Brown – Gauticle (Synaesthesia)". Cyclic Defrost. Archived from the original on 11 October 2014. Retrieved 24 June 2020 – via Trove (National Library of Australia).
  29. ^ Pateras, Anthony (2007), Chasms, Lisbon: SIRR, retrieved 26 June 2020
  30. ^ "Release Errors of the Human Body by Anthony Pateras". MusicBrainz. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
  31. ^ Clark, Phillip (October 2012). "Review: Pateras Collected Works 2002–2012". Gramophone. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
  32. ^ Pateras, Anthony (18 March 2015), Delirioso, retrieved 26 June 2020
  33. ^ Baker Fish, Bob (14 February 2016). "Anthony Pateras/ Erkki Veltheim – Entertainment = Control (Immediata)". Cyclic Defrost. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
  34. ^ Pateras, Anthony; Rollet, Dennis, (recording engineer); Deistler, Stefan, (recording engineer); Anderson, Natasha, (editor) (2017), Blood Stretched Out, Belgium: Immediata, retrieved 26 June 2020CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link) CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)

External links[edit]