Anthrone

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Anthrone
Skeletal formula
Ball-and-stick model
Names
IUPAC name
10H-Anthracen-9-one
Other names
Carbothrone; anthranone; 9-oxoanthracene
Identifiers
3D model (Jmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.001.813
Properties
C14H10O
Molar mass 194.23 g·mol−1
Appearance White to light yellow needles
Density Solid
Melting point 155 to 158 °C (311 to 316 °F; 428 to 431 K)
Boiling point 721 °C (1,330 °F; 994 K)
Insoluble
-118·10−6 cm3/mol
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Anthrone is a tricyclic aromatic ketone. It is used for a popular cellulose assay and in the colorometric determination of carbohydrates.[1] The anthrones are used in pharmacy as laxative. They stimulate the motion of the colon and are responsible for less water reabsorption. They may only be used for a short amount of time, because long time use may lead to loss of electrolytes. Anthrones are gained from rhamus frangula, rhamnus purshiana, aloe feroxx, rheum officinale, cassia senna, cassia angustifolia, etc...

References[edit]

  1. ^ Trevelyan, W. E.; Forrest, RS; Harrison, JS (1952). "Determination of Yeast Carbohydrates with the Anthrone Reagent". Nature. 170 (4328): 626–627. doi:10.1038/170626a0. PMID 13002392.