Anthropometric history

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Anthropometric history is the study of the history of human height and weight.[1][2] It has historical roots. In the 1830s, Adolphe Quetelet and Louis R. Villermé studied the physical stature of populations.[3][4] In the 1960s, French historians analyzed the relationship between socio-economic variables and human height.[5] Anthropometric history was established as field of study in the late 1970s when economic historians Robert Fogel, John Komlos, Richard Steckel and other academics began to study the history of human physical stature and its relationship to economic development.[6] A branch of cliometrics, it uses trends and cross-sectional patterns in human physical stature to understand historical processes.[7]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Tanner, JM (1981). A history of the study of human growth. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9780521134026. OCLC 755936888.
  2. ^ Snowdon, Brian (2005). "Measures of Progress and Other Tall Stories: From income to anthropometrics - World Economics". World Economics. 6 (2). pp. 87–136. Retrieved 2018-10-31.
  3. ^ Villermé, LR (1829). Mémoire sur la taille de l'homme en France. Annales d'Hygiène Publique et de Médicine Légale. 1. pp. 551–559.
  4. ^ Quetelet, A (1831). Recherches sur la loi de croissance de l'homme. Annales d'Hygiène Publique et de Médicine Légale. 6. pp. 89–113.
  5. ^ Ladurie, Emmanuel Le Roy; Bernageau, Nicole; Pasquet, Yvonne (1969). "Le Conscrit et l'ordinateur: Perspectives de recherches sur les archives militaires du XIXe siècle francais". Studi Storici. 10 (2): 260–308. JSTOR 20562980.
  6. ^ Fogel, Robert W.; Engerman, Stanley L.; Trussell, James; Floud, Roderick; Pope, Clayne L.; Wimmer, Larry T. (1978). "The Economics of Mortality in North America, 1650–1910: A Description of a Research Project". Historical Methods: A Journal of Quantitative and Interdisciplinary History. 11 (2): 75–108. doi:10.1080/01615440.1978.9955221. ISSN 0161-5440.
  7. ^ Snowdon, Brian (2005). "Measures of Progress and Other Tall Stories: From income to anthropometrics - World Economics". World Economics. 6 (2). pp. 87–136.