Anti-Heroin Act of 1924

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Anti-Heroin Act of 1924
Great Seal of the United States
Long title An Act prohibiting the importation of crude opium for the purpose of manufacturing heroin.
Nicknames Opium Importation Prohibition Act of 1924
Enacted by the 68th United States Congress
Effective June 7, 1924
Citations
Public law 68-274
Statutes at Large 43 Stat. 657
Codification
Titles amended 21 U.S.C.: Food and Drugs
U.S.C. sections amended 21 U.S.C. ch. 6 § 173
Legislative history
  • Introduced in the House as H.R. 7079 by Stephen G. Porter (RPA) on April 17, 1924
  • Committee consideration by House Ways and Means
  • Passed the House on April 21, 1924 (Passed)
  • Passed the Senate on May 27, 1924 (Passed)
  • Signed into law by President Calvin Coolidge on June 7, 1924

Anti-Heroin Act of 1924 is a United States federal law prohibiting the importation and possession of opium for the chemical synthesis of an addictive narcotic known as diamorphine or heroin. The Act of Congress amended the Smoking Opium Exclusion Act of 1909 which authorized the importation of the poppy plant for medicinal purposes utilizing an opium pipe or vaporization to consume the euphoric opiate.[1]

The H.R. 7079 legislation was passed by the 68th United States Congressional session and enacted into law by the 30th President of the United States Calvin Coolidge on June 7, 1924.

Repeal of Anti-Heroin Act[edit]

The 1924 United States public law was repealed by the enactment of Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act on October 27, 1970.[2]

World Conference on Narcotic Education[edit]

GlycoHeroin.jpg

The League of Nations and United States began participating in world narcotic conferences in the early 1900s. In 1924, United States House of Representatives passed a resolution for international conferences better known as The Hague Opium Convention.[3]

In 1926, 69th United States Congress held hearings on a House resolution for the United States participation in the first narcotic education conference to be conducted in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from July 5 to July 9, 1926.[4]

In the early 1930s, the World Conference on Narcotic Education meetings were held at the Hotel McAlpin in New York City, New York where the 31st President of the United States Herbert Hoover issued public statements stressing narcotic drugs as a "fearful menace" and a "menace to society".[5][6][7]

In popular culture[edit]

Heroin-Werbung.jpg

American motion pictures were produced promoting awareness about the adverse health effects and social implications of heroin or narcotics use.

The Man with the Golden Arm (1955)
Monkey on My Back (1957)
The Narcotic Story (1958)
Trash (1970)
Jennifer on My Mind (1971)
The Panic in Needle Park (1971)
Lady Sings the Blues (1972)
Who'll Stop the Rain (1978)
American Gangster (2007)
Puncture (2011)

See also[edit]

Derivatives of Heroin
Narcotic Elixirs

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Smoking Opium Exclusion Act of 1909 - P.L. 60-221" (PDF). 35 Stat. 614 ~ House Bill 27427. Legis★Works. February 9, 1909. 
  2. ^ "21 U.S.C. ~ Subchapter II - Import and Export § 952" (PDF). Title 21 - Food and Drugs ~ Chapter 13 - Drug Abuse Prevention and Control. U.S. Government Publishing Office. 
  3. ^ "Opium and Narcotic Drugs Control Conferences ~ Public Resolution 68-20" (PDF). 43 Stat. 119 ~ House Joint Resolution 195. Legis★Works. May 15, 1924. 
  4. ^ Middlemiss, Herbert Samuel (1926). Narcotic Education: Proceedings of the First World Conference on Narcotic Education, July 5-9, 1926, Philadelphia. Washington, D.C.: H.S. Middlemiss. pp. 1–403. OCLC 2736915. 
  5. ^ Peters, Gerhard; Woolley, John T. "Herbert Hoover: "Message to the World Conference on Narcotic Education.," February 21, 1930". The American Presidency Project. University of California - Santa Barbara. 
  6. ^ Peters, Gerhard; Woolley, John T. "Herbert Hoover: "Message to the World Conference on Narcotic Education.," February 20, 1931". The American Presidency Project. University of California - Santa Barbara. 
  7. ^ Peters, Gerhard; Woolley, John T. "Herbert Hoover: "Message to the World Conference on Narcotic Education.," February 18, 1932". The American Presidency Project. University of California - Santa Barbara. 

External links[edit]