Anti-café

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Ziferblat, an anti-café in Moscow

An anti-café (sometimes called a pay-per-minute café or a time club) is a venue that offers working space, food and drink, where customers only pay for the amount of time they spend in the establishment. Anti-cafés became popular around 2011 in Russia and some CIS countries, with further independent anti-cafés opening across the world. Anti-cafés include the Ziferblat chain, founded by Russian writer Ivan Mitin in December 2010 in Moscow,[1] the "Slow Time" cafe in Wiesbaden opened in 2013,[2] and "Dialogues" in Bangalore.[3]

The anti-cafe concept mostly targets entrepreneurs, digital nomads, students, and creatives who need a cheap and convenient place to get their work done and meet other professionals.[4] Spaces can also be used by companies as a place to organize presentations and press conferences at low cost.

Operation[edit]

Kaliningrad Creative Library Laboratory in 2012

Customers at an anti-café do not pay directly for what they drink and eat, instead paying for the time they spend in the space, typically on a pay-per-minute basis. They may help themselves to coffee and tea, snacks, and desserts in that time. As well as food and drink, anti-cafés may offer board games, libraries of books, coworking facilities, wireless Internet access, films, and video game consoles.[5] Services vary according to spaces, with some offering lunch or brunch meals.[6]

Be'kech in Berlin

Although all anti-cafes work on the "pay for your time" basis, pricing systems vary. L'Anticafé in Paris operates on a pay-per-hour basis, where customers can also pay a cheaper day rate for an entire day.[7][8] Others have the option of a pay-per-minute method, such Be'kech in Berlin.[9] An anti-café in Bordeaux uses a hybrid model of charging a fixed fee for the first hour and by the minute beyond that.[10]

See also[edit]

Related articles[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bert van Pool (24 October 2014). "A Trend in European Cities: The Anti-Cafe". The Huffington Post. Retrieved 12 November 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ "'Time is money' in new Wiesbaden café". 27 May 2013. Retrieved 28 June 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ "We Tried Out The New Bangalore Cafe Where You Pay Only For The Time - OfficeChai". officechai.com. Retrieved 28 June 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "We Tried Out The New Bangalore Cafe Where You Pay Only For The Time - OfficeChai". officechai.com. Retrieved 28 June 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ Poll, Bart van (2014-10-24). "A Trend in European Cities: The Anti-Cafe". Huffington Post. Retrieved 2017-07-11.
  6. ^ "be'kech - Berlin's First Anti-Cafe and Coworking Space". be'kech. Retrieved 2 February 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ "Paris: AntiCafé offers coffee and Wi-Fi for €4 | EuroCheapo". EuroCheapo's Budget Travel Blog. 30 June 2014. Retrieved 2 February 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ "'Time is money' in new Wiesbaden café". 27 May 2013. Retrieved 28 June 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ King, Megan. "Berlin's First Anti-Café Opens Its Doors". Culture Trip. Retrieved 2019-01-30.
  10. ^ France, Connexion. "New cafe charges customers by the hour..." www.connexionfrance.com. Retrieved 2 February 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)