Anticyclonic storm

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An anticyclonic storm is a weather storm where winds around the storm flow in the direction opposite to that of the flow above a region of low pressure.

Description[edit]

In the Northern Hemisphere, anticyclonic storms involve clockwise wind flow; in the Southern Hemisphere, they involve counterclockwise wind flow.

Anticyclonic storms usually form around high-pressure systems. These do not "contradict" the Coriolis effect; it predicts such anticyclonic flow about high-pressure regions. Anticyclonic storms, as high-pressure systems, usually accompany cold weather and are frequently a factor in large snowstorms. Jupiter's Great Red Spot is a well-known non-terrestrial example of an anticyclonic system.

Anticyclonic tornadoes often occur;[1] while tornadoes' vortices are low-pressure regions, this occurs because tornadoes occur on a small enough scale such that the Coriolis effect is negligible.

Examples[edit]

Satellite view showing the interaction of Cyclone Emma nearing from the Southwest and Anticyclone Hartmut covering Europe from the Northeast on 27 February
Satellite view showing the beginning interaction of Cyclone Emma nearing from the Southwest and Anticyclone Hartmut covering Europe from the Northeast on 27 February. As the collision of the systems continued, Emma's structure became much more distorted on 28 February.[2]
  • 25 February 2018 – 4 March: Hartmut, an exceptionally strong anticyclone whose winds peaked at 187 km/h (116 mph) and whose central pressure peaked at 1056 hPa, both in Scandinavia. This anticyclonic storm with hurricane-force maximum gusts channeled freezing air from a Siberian airmass all over Europe, triggering the Beast from the East, a deadly cold wave with historical significance. Having dropped large amounts of snow in some European areas, Hartmut was a rare instance of an "anticyclonic blizzard". The interaction of Anticyclone Hartmut and Cyclone Emma intensified the wind and snowfall threat in Western Europe, particularly on the British Isles.

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