Antimony triiodide

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Antimony triiodide
Antimony-triiodide-from-xtal-3D-balls.png
SbIstructure.jpg
Antimoon kwalitatieve analyse.png
Names
IUPAC name
Antimony triiodide, Antimony(III) iodide
Systematic IUPAC name
Triiodostibane
Identifiers
7790-44-5 N
ChemSpider 23032 YesY
EC number 232-205-8
Jmol-3D images Image
Image
PubChem 24630
Properties
I3Sb
Molar mass 502.47 g·mol−1
Appearance red crystals
Density 4.921 g/cm3
Melting point 170.5 °C (338.9 °F; 443.6 K)
Boiling point 401.6 °C (754.9 °F; 674.8 K)
reacts
Solubility soluble in benzene, alcohol, acetone, CS2, HCl, KI, SnCl4, C2H7N
insoluble in CHCl3, CCl4[1]
Solubility in diiodomethane 10.15% v/v (12 °C)[2]
-0.0001472 cm3/ mol
Structure
Rhombohedral, hR24,
R-3, No. 148
1.58 D
Thermochemistry
81.6 J/mol·K (gas)[1]
-100.4 kJ/mol[1]
Hazards
GHS pictograms The exclamation-mark pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)The environment pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)[3]
GHS signal word Warning
H302, H332, H411[3]
P273[3]
EU classification Harmful Xn Dangerous for the Environment (Nature) N
R-phrases R20/22, R51/53
S-phrases S61
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
 N verify (what isYesY/N?)
Infobox references

Antimony triiodide is the chemical compound with the formula SbI3. This ruby-red solid is the only characterized "binary" iodide of antimony, i.e. the sole compound isolated with the formula SbxIy. It contains antimony in its +3 oxidation state. Like many iodides of the heavier main group elements, its structure depends on the phase. Gaseous SbI3 is a molecular, pyramidal species as anticipated by VSEPR theory. In the solid state, however, the Sb center is surrounded by an octahedron of six iodide ligands, three of which are closer and three more distant.[4] For the related compound BiI3, all six Bi—I distances are equal.[5]

Production[edit]

It may be formed by the reaction of antimony with elemental iodine, or the reaction of antimony trioxide with hydroiodic acid.

Alternatively, it may be prepared by the interaction of antimony and iodine in boiling benzene or tetrachloroethane.

Uses[edit]

SbI3 has been used as a dopant in the preparation of thermoelectric materials.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c http://chemister.ru/Database/properties-en.php?dbid=1&id=5180
  2. ^ Seidell, Atherton; Linke, William F. (1952). [Google Books Solubilities of Inorganic and Organic Compounds]. Van Nostrand. Retrieved 2014-05-29. 
  3. ^ a b c Sigma-Aldrich Co., Antimony(III) iodide. Retrieved on 2014-05-29.
  4. ^ Hsueh, H.C., Chen, R.K., Vass, H., Clark, S.J., Ackland, G.J., Poon, W.C.K., Crain, J. (1998). "Compression mechanisms in quasimolecular XI3 (X = As, Sb, Bi) solids". Physical Review B 58 (22): 14812–14822. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.58.14812. 
  5. ^ Holleman, A. F.; Wiberg, E. "Inorganic Chemistry" Academic Press: San Diego, 2001. ISBN 0-12-352651-5.
  6. ^ D.-Y. Chung, T. Hogan, P. Brazis, M. Rocci-Lane, C. Kannewurf, M. Bastea, C. Uher, M. G. Kanatzidis (2000). "CsBi4Te6: A High-Performance Thermoelectric Material for Low-Temperature Applications". Science 287 (5455): 1024–7. doi:10.1126/science.287.5455.1024. PMID 10669411. 

External links[edit]

HI He
LiI BeI2 BI3 CI4 NI3 I2O4,
I2O5,
I4O9
IF,
IF3,
IF5,
IF7
Ne
NaI MgI2 AlI3 SiI4 PI3,
P2I4
S ICl,
ICl3
Ar
KI CaI2 Sc TiI4 VI3 CrI3 MnI2 FeI2 CoI2 NiI2 CuI ZnI2 Ga2I6 GeI2,
GeI4
AsI3 Se IBr Kr
RbI SrI2 Y ZrI4 Nb Mo Tc Ru Rh Pd AgI CdI2 InI3 SnI4,
SnI2
SbI3 TeI4 I Xe
CsI BaI2   Hf Ta W Re Os Ir Pt AuI Hg2I2,
HgI2
TlI PbI2 BiI3 Po AtI Rn
Fr Ra   Rf Db Sg Bh Hs Mt Ds Rg Cn Uut Fl Uup Lv Uus Uuo
La Ce Pr Nd Pm SmI2 Eu Gd TbI3 Dy Ho Er Tm Yb Lu
Ac ThI4 Pa UI3,
UI4
Np Pu Am Cm Bk Cf Es Fm Md No Lr