Antoine de Créqui Canaples

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Antoine de Créqui Canaples

Antoine de Créqui Canaples (1531–1574) was a French Roman Catholic bishop and cardinal.

Biography[edit]

Antoine de Créqui Canaples was born in the Kingdom of France on July 17, 1531, the son of Jean de Créqui, seigneur of Canaples, and his wife Marie d'Acigné.[1] After the death of his two brothers, he inherited his family's vast wealth; upon his death, he left this fortune to his sister's son Antoine de Blanchefort (the father of Charles de Blanchefort).[1] In 1539, he was sent to Paris to be educated.[1]

Créqui began his ecclesiastical career as a cleric in Thérouanne.[1] He was designated Bishop of Thérouanne in 1553, but never occupied the see.[1] He became Chancellor of the Order of Saint Michael and was a Knight of the Order of the Holy Spirit.[1] He was also the Provost of the Premonstratensian Sélincourt Abbey.[1]

In 1552, Henry II of France nominated him to be Bishop of Nantes.[1] The cathedral chapter of Nantes Cathedral elected him Bishop of Nantes on December 15, 1553.[1] He was subsequently ordained as a priest on the morning of April 22, 1554 by Gilles de Gaude, titular bishop of Rhaphanaea.[1] Later that afternoon, he was then consecrated as a bishop by François de Laval, Bishop of Dol.[1] On July 14, 1564, he was transferred to the Diocese of Amiens, exchanging his see with Cardinal Nicolas de Pellevé.[1] He was a member of the French Conseil d'État under Charles IX of France.[1]

Pope Pius IV made him a cardinal deacon in the consistory of March 12, 1565.[1] He did not participate in the papal conclave of 1565-66 that elected Pope Pius V.[1] On March 13, 1566, he received the red hat and the titular church of San Trifonio (a deaconry raised pro illa vice to the status of title).[1] He did not participate in the papal conclave of 1572 that elected Pope Gregory XIII.[1]

He died in Amiens on June 20, 1574.[1] According to his will, he received heart burial, with his body being buried in the Benedictine Moreuil Abbey and his heart was buried in Amiens Cathedral.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church