Antonio Joli

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Antonio Joli
Departure of Charles III from Naples.jpg
Antonio Joli, Departure of Charles III of Spain from Naples, Museo del Prado, 1759
Born 1700
Modena
Died 29 April 1777
Naples
Movement vedutisti

Antonio Joli or Ioli (1700 – 29 April 1777) was an Italian painter of vedute and capricci.

Biography[edit]

Born in Modena, he first was apprenticed to Rafaello Rinaldi. He then studied in Rome under Giovanni Paolo Panini, and in the studios of the Galli da Bibbiena family of scene-painters. He became a painter of stage sets in Modena and Perugia. In 1732 he moved to Venice, where he worked as stage-painter for opera productions at the Teatro di San Giovanni Grisostomo and the Teatro San Samuele of the Grimani family. In 1742 he went to Dresden, and then to London (1744–48) and Madrid (1750–54).[1] In London, he decorated the Richmond mansion of John James Heidegger, then the director of the King's Theatre in the Haymarket.[2] Joli returned to Venice in 1754, where he became one of the 36 founding members of the Accademia di Belle Arti di Venezia. He moved to the Bourbon court of Naples in 1761,[1] and died there on 29 April 1777.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Susan Tipton (2010). Diplomatie und Zeremoniell in Botschafterbildern von Carlevarijs und Canaletto (in German). RIHA Journal: International Association of Research Institutes in the History of Art. 2010:0008. URN urn:nun:de:101:1-201010062457. Accessed July 2013.
  2. ^ Ralph Toledano (2006). Antonio Joli: Modena 1700-1777 Napoli (in Italian). Torino: Artema. ISBN 9788880521006. p. 188.

Further reading[edit]

Gallery[edit]

The departure of the nuncio Stoppani from the Doge's Palace after his audience; National Gallery of Art, Washington 
The greeting of Nuncio Stoppani, 1741; National Gallery of Art, Washington 
Rome, A View of the Forum with the Campo Vaccino, the church of Santa Francesca and the Colosseum 
Prospect of London 
Piazza Navona Allagata 
View of Calle de Alcalá, Madrid 

External links[edit]