Antonio Zamora

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Antonio Zamora
Antonio Zamora-2018.jpg
Zamora in 2018
Alma mater
Scientific career
Fields
InstitutionsIBM

Antonio Zamora is a consultant in the fields of computer programming, chemical information science, and computational linguistics who worked about chemical search systems and automatic spelling correction algorithms.[citation needed]

Career[edit]

Zamora studied chemistry at the University of Texas (B.S. 1962), and served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam era from 1962 to 1965. He studied medical technology at the Medical Field Service School (MFSS) in Fort Sam Houston and worked in hematology at Brooke Army Medical Center.[citation needed]

After concluding his military service, he worked at Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) in Columbus, Ohio as an editor of one of the first computer-produced publications in the United States. While working for CAS, he gained a master's degree in Computer Science from Ohio State University (M.S. 1969), and began working in their programming department; eventually he transferred to the research department where he was able to combine his chemical background with programming.[citation needed]

He contributed to the development of a chemical registry system, chemical structure input systems, devised an algorithm for determining the Smallest Set of Smallest Rings (SSSR), [1] a cheminformatics term for the minimal cycle basis of a molecular graph, experimental automatic abstracting, indexing programs, and spelling aid algorithms.[2][3]

In 1982 he joined IBM Corporation as a senior programmer working on spell checkers and multilingual information retrieval tools. After his retirement from IBM in 1996, Zamora established Zamora Consulting, LLC[4] and worked as a consultant for the American Chemical Society (ACS), the National Library of Medicine (NLM), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) to support semantic enhancements for search engines.[5]

Post-retirement[edit]

In his retirement Zamora has also self-published a science fiction book[6], and several small books while investigating the Carolina Bays[7][8][9]; in his 2017 paper "A model for the geomorphology of the Carolina Bays" he proposed that the "Carolina Bays are the remodeled remains of oblique conical craters formed on ground liquefied by the seismic shock waves of secondary impacts of glacier ice boulders ejected by an extraterrestrial impact on the Laurentide Ice Sheet".[10] His research was based on geometrical analysis of the Carolina Bays using Google Earth in combination with LiDAR data.[11] The theory is not widely accepted.[citation needed] Many other theories have been proposed to account for their formation.[12][13].

SPEEDCOP project[edit]

Zamora carried out pioneering[citation needed] research on the automatic spelling correction SPEEDCOP project (SPEIIing Error Detection correction Project); the project was supported by National Science Foundation (NSF) at Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) and extracted over 50,000 misspellings from approximately 25,000,000 words of text from seven scientific and scholarly databases.[14]

The purpose of the project was to automatically correct spelling errors, predominantly typing errors, in a database of scientific abstracts. For each word in a dictionary, a key is computed consisting of the first letter, followed by the consonant letters in order of occurrence, followed by the vowel letters in order of occurrence, each letter recorded once only, e.g. inoculation will produce a key INCLTOUA, the keys are sorted in order. The key of each word in the text is compared with the dictionary keys and if no exact match is found it compares with keys either side to find a probable match. The use of the key reduces the portion of the dictionary that has to be searched. [15]

Awards[edit]

  • 1971: the best paper of the year award of the Journal of the American Society for Information Science was awarded to James E. Rush, R. Salvador, and Zamora, for the paper "Automatic Abstracting and Indexing".[16]
  • 2011: winner of the National Library of Medicine's award "Show off Your Apps: Innovative Uses of NLM Information".[17][18]

Publications[edit]

Papers[edit]

  • Antonio Zamora, 2017, A model for the geomorphology of the Carolina Bays. Geomorphology. 282: 209–216.
  • Rudolf Frisch, Antonio Zamora, 1988, Spelling Assistance for Compound Words. IBM Journal of Research and Development 32(2): 195-200
  • Joseph J. Pollock, Antonio Zamora, 1984 Automatic Spelling Correction in Scientific and Scholarly Text. Commun. ACM 27(4): 358-368
  • Joseph J. Pollock, Antonio Zamora, 1984 System design for detection and correction of spelling errors in scientific and scholarly text. JASIS 35(2): 104-109
  • Joseph J. Pollock, Antonio Zamora, 1983 Collection and characterization of spelling errors in scientific and scholarly text. JASIS 34(1): 51-58
  • E. M. Zamora, Joseph J. Pollock, Antonio Zamora, 1981 The use of trigram analysis for spelling error detection. Inf. Process. Manage. 17(6): 305-316
  • Antonio Zamora, 1980 Automatic detection and correction of spelling errors in a large data base. JASIS 31(1): 51-57
  • Karen A. Hamill, Antonio Zamora, 1980 The use of titles for automatic document classification. JASIS 31(6): 396-402
  • David L. Dayton, M. J. Fletcher, Charles W. Moulton, Joseph J. Pollock, Antonio Zamora, 1977 Comparison of the Retrieval Effectiveness of CA Condensates (CACon) and CA Subject Index Alert (CASIA). Journal of Chemical Information and Computer Sciences 17(1): 20-28
  • Ronald G. Dunn, William Fisanick, Antonio Zamora, 1977 A Chemical Substructure Search System Based on Chemical Abstracts Index Nomenclature. Journal of Chemical Information and Computer Sciences 17(4): 212-219
  • Tommy Ebe, Antonio Zamora, 1976 Wiswesser Line Notation Processing at Chemical Abstracts Service. Journal of Chemical Information and Computer Sciences 16(1): 33-35
  • Antonio Zamora, David L. Dayton, 1976. The Chemical Abstracts Service Chemical Registry System. V. Structure Input and Editing. Journal of Chemical Information and Computer Sciences 16(4): 219-222
  • Joseph J. Pollock, Antonio Zamora, 1975. Automatic Abstracting Research at Chemical Abstracts Service. Journal of Chemical Information and Computer Sciences 15(4): 226-232
  • Zamora, Antonio (2017-04-01). "A model for the geomorphology of the Carolina Bays". Geomorphology. 282: 209–216. doi:10.1016/j.geomorph.2017.01.019. ISSN 0169-555X. Available also as PDF: https://cosmictusk.com/wp-content/uploads/A-model-for-the-geomorphology-of-the-Carolina-Bays.pdf

Books[edit]

  • Zamora, Antonio (2015-07-13). Solving the Mystery of the Carolina Bays. [United States]: Zamora Consulting, LLC. ISBN 9780983652397. OCLC 1100115872.
  • Zamora, Antonio. Rise of the Transgenic Queen. ScientificPsychic.com. ISBN 098365235X.

Further reading[edit]

  • [5] Su Zhang, University of Kent, Spell Checking using the Google Web API (contains details of SPEEDCOP algorithm)
  • [6] Bakar, Z. A., Sembok, T. M. and Yusoff, M. (2000), An evaluation of retrieval effectiveness using spelling‐correction and string‐similarity matching methods on Malay texts. J. Am. Soc. Inf. Sci., 51: 691-706. (Evaluates SPEEDCOP and other algorithms)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zamora, Antonio (1976). "An Algorithm for Finding the Smallest Set of Smallest Rings". Journal of Chemical Information and Computer Sciences. 16 (1): 40–43. doi:10.1021/ci60005a013.
  2. ^ A. Zamora, 1978. "Control of Spelling Errors in Large Data Bases", The Information Age in Perspective, Proc. ASIS, 15, 364-367.
  3. ^ A. Zamora, 1980. "Automatic Detection and Correction of Spelling Errors in a Large Data Base", J. ASIS, 31, No. 1, 51-57.
  4. ^ Zamora Consulting official website
  5. ^ [1] Antonio Zamora Curriculum Vitae
  6. ^ Zamora, Antonio (2013). Rise of the Transgenic Queen. Zamora Consulting LLC. ISBN 9780983652359.
  7. ^ Zamora, Antonio (2012). Meteorite Cluster Impacts. Zamora Consulting LLC.
  8. ^ Zamora, Antonio (2014). Killer Comet: What the Carolina Bays tell us. Zamora Consulting LLC. ISBN 978-0983652373.
  9. ^ Zamora, Antonio (2015). Solving the Mystery of the Carolina Bays. Zamora Consulting LLC. ISBN 9780983652397.
  10. ^ Zamora, Antonio (2017). "A model for the geomorphology of the Carolina Bays". Geomorphology. 282: 282: 209–216. Bibcode:2017Geomo.282..209Z. doi:10.1016/j.geomorph.2017.01.019.
  11. ^ Orengo, Hector; Petrie, Cameron (2018). "Multi‐scale relief model (MSRM): a new algorithm for the visualization of subtle topographic change of variable size in digital elevation models". Earth Surface Processes and Landforms. 43 (6): 1361–1369. doi:10.1002/esp.4317. PMC 6036439. PMID 30008499.
  12. ^ "The Enigmatic Carolina bays". Cintos Research.
  13. ^ "The Fiery Origins of Carolina Bays". Coastal Review Online. 2013-08-23. Retrieved 12 June 2019.
  14. ^ [2] Pollock, Joseph J.; Zamora, Antonio, 1984. System Design for Detection and Correction of Spelling Errors in Scientific and Scholarly Text. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, v35 n2 p104
  15. ^ Mitton, Dr Roger. "3. Spellchecking by Computer" (PDF). Journal of the Simplified Spelling Society. Retrieved 14 June 2019.
  16. ^ Best JASIST Paper Award, https://www.asis.org/awards/jasis_paper.html
  17. ^ [3] Devpost: Antonio Zamora
  18. ^ [4] Devpost: Show off your Apps