Anvard

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Anvard
The Chronicles of Narnia location
Created by C. S. Lewis
Genre Juvenile fantasy
Type Castle
Notable characters King Lune
First appearance The Horse and His Boy

Anvard is the moatless castle where King Lune of Archenland resides in the fictional land of Narnia, as described in The Chronicles of Narnia, a book series by C. S. Lewis. It is made of red-brown stones and sits on a green lawn in front of a high woody ridge. In The Horse and His Boy, Prince Rabadash led a force of two hundred Calormene horsemen in a surprise attack against it, but was defeated by a relief army from Narnia led by King Edmund.[1]

Hermit of the Southern March[edit]

Shasta and Aravis cross the desert and reach the Hermit of the Southern March. There, Shasta meets King Lune. King Lune takes Shasta to Narnia. He loses his way out of the army and goes to some animals living in Narnia. They send a stag to Cair Paravel.[2] The actual identity of the Hermit is never clarified. He plays a role similar to Coriakin and Ramandu, who are stars spending time away from the skies on Narnian earth in the guise of mystical or magical old men, away from the mainstream of human society.

Relief army[edit]

Shasta's attempts to get help are successful. Chervy the Stag arrives at Cair Paravel in time to meet the Splendour Hyaline as it arrives home from Tashbaan. This allows a relief army from Narnia to be organised to rescue Anvard, with both Queen Lucy and King Edmund leading the company with Lord Peridan as the herald and banner bearer. Prince Corin is also in the company, but defies strict orders to not participate in the ensuing battle after he fights and causes his dwarf guardian Thornbut to twist his ankle. Corin sights Shasta and persuades him against Shasta's better judgement to join him in the battle. The role of the big cats and the main events in the battle are narrated by The Hermit of the Southern March, as he watches the battle in his pool.[3]

Fight at Anvard[edit]

Rabadash was planning a secret attack, but due to the chain of events beginning with Lasaraleen and Aravis overhearing Rabadash's plans in Tashbaan, Narnia arrives in time to prevent Rabadash and his army from making a successful siege against Archenland's chief castle. The Narnian relief army (consisting of men on horses, men on talking horses, centaurs, bears, dogs, leopards, panthers, dwarves, and six giants) defeats them. Shasta is slightly injured in the battle. After the battle is over, King Lune recognizes Shasta as his own long-lost son Cor, Prince of Archenland and twin to Corin.[4]

There is no other reference to Anvard in any of the other books in the Narnia series, although a reference is made to King Nain of Archenland in the book Prince Caspian; who no doubt represents the remaining descendants of Cor and Aravis.[5]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Anvard#A
  2. ^ The Horse And His Boy, Chapter 10, 11
  3. ^ The Horse and His Boy, Chapter 12
  4. ^ The Horse And His Boy, Chapter 13,14,15
  5. ^ Prince Caspian, Chapter 5