Apley

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Apley
Apley is located in Lincolnshire
Apley
Apley
Location within Lincolnshire
OS grid referenceTF110750
• London120 mi (190 km) S
District
Shire county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townMarket Rasen
Postcode districtLN8
PoliceLincolnshire
FireLincolnshire
AmbulanceEast Midlands
EU ParliamentEast Midlands
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Lincolnshire
53°15′39″N 0°20′12″W / 53.260914°N 0.336684°W / 53.260914; -0.336684Coordinates: 53°15′39″N 0°20′12″W / 53.260914°N 0.336684°W / 53.260914; -0.336684

Apley is a hamlet and civil parish in the West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England. It is situated 1 mile (1.6 km) west from the hamlet of Kingthorpe and the site of Kingthorpe railway station, and approximately 2 miles (3 km) south-west from Wragby.

St Andrew's Church, Apley

Apley church, dedicated to St Andrew, is a small brick building erected in 1871 at a cost of £284. It was built to conduct burial services within the graveyard of the former and by then non-existing medieval Church St Andrew's, which before 1816 had decayed and been reduced to its foundations. In the 19th century the churchyard also served the parish of Stainfield. Apley is recorded in White's Directory as a village and parish with a population of 231, and a land area of 1,658 acres (6.7 km2), 300 acres (1.2 km2) of which was woodland, and included the hamlets of Kingthorpe and Hop Lane. Apley professions and trades listed in 1872 included a parish clerk, a boot & shoemaker, six farmers, two of whom were at Kingthorpe, and two carriers, one of whom was a shopkeeper.[1][2]

Apley Beck marks the course of a 12th-century monastic canal linking Bullington Priory to Barlings eau.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ White, William (1872), Whites Directory of Lincolnshire, p.500
  2. ^ "St Andrew's Church, Apley", Lincs to the Past, Lincolnshire County Council. Retrieved 29 December 2018
  3. ^ Historic England. "Apley Beck (892369)". PastScape. Retrieved 6 July 2011.

External links[edit]