Apor Péc

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Apor Péc
Palatine of Hungary
Reign 1298–1299
1304–1307
Predecessor Amade Aba
Nicholas Kőszegi (1st term)
several office-holders (2nd term)
Successor Amade Aba (1st term)
several office-holders (2nd term)
Born ?
Died 1307
Noble family gens Péc
Father Mark

Apor from the kindred Péc (Hungarian: Péc nembeli Apor; died 1307) was a Hungarian baron and landowner, who held several secular positions during the reign of kings Ladislaus IV and Andrew III.[1]

Biography[edit]

He was born into the Zala branch of the gens Péc as the son of ispán (comes) Mark (d. around 1245). He had four siblings, including Gregory, judge royal in 1288 and Lucas, ispán of Zala County from 1289 to 1291.[1]

Apor Péc began his political career during the reign of Ladislaus IV; he served as master of the horse[2] and ispán of Zala County[3] in 1280. Three years later, he was appointed voivode of Transylvania,[4][5] when a series of royal concessions to the aristocracy forced Roland Borsa to resign his voivodeship in favour of Apor Péc. However Borsa returned to Transylvania and retook the office in 1284.

When king Ladislaus IV led a campaign against Ivan Kőszegi and captured Kőszeg in 1286, Apor Péc, in alliance with Nicholas Kőszegi, besieged and occupied the castle of Pressburg (Pozsony; today Bratislava, Slovakia), as well as devastated its surrounding area in winter that year. However a local noble, John, son of Peter gathered his relatives and their forces and defeated the army of Péc, who seriously injured during the battle. After that John reconquered the castle of Pressburg. Apor Péc lost his political influence for several years after this betrayal.[1]

After the coronation of Andrew III, he served as ispán of Pozsony County between 1291 and 1292.[6] In this capacity, he and one of his brothers, Lucas conquered by force the Tátika Castle which owned by the Diocese of Veszprém and built by Zlaudus Kaplon decades earlier. The bishop, Benedict Rád vainly objected at the royal court, but the castle has been restored to its original owner only after the death of Apor Péc.

He served as judge royal from 1293 to 1297.[7] He became palatine of Hungary for the Transdanubian region (while Roland Rátót was responsible for Cisdanubia) in 1298 and held that office until the next year. During the era of the Interregnum (1301–1310), he was mentioned as a "baron". Among others, he arbitrarily took and used the title of palatine from 1304 until his death.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Markó 2006, p. 247.
  2. ^ Zsoldos 2011, p. 58.
  3. ^ Zsoldos 2011, p. 233.
  4. ^ Zsoldos 2011, p. 40.
  5. ^ Engel 2001, p. 382.
  6. ^ Zsoldos 2011, p. 186.
  7. ^ Zsoldos 2011, p. 35.

Sources[edit]

  • Engel, Pál (2001). The Realm of St Stephen: A History of Medieval Hungary, 895-1526. I.B. Tauris Publishers. ISBN 1-86064-061-3.
  • (in Hungarian) Markó, László (2006). A magyar állam főméltóságai Szent Istvántól napjainkig – Életrajzi Lexikon ("The High Officers of the Hungarian State from Saint Stephen to the Present Days – A Biographical Encyclopedia") (2nd edition); Helikon Kiadó Kft., Budapest; ISBN 963-547-085-1.
  • (in Hungarian) Zsoldos, Attila (2011). Magyarország világi archontológiája, 1000–1301 ("Secular Archontology of Hungary, 1000–1301"). História, MTA Történettudományi Intézete. Budapest. ISBN 978-963-9627-38-3

External links[edit]

Apor
Genus Péc
Born:  ?  Died: 1307
Political offices
Preceded by
H.
Master of the horse
1280
Succeeded by
Roland Rátót
Preceded by
Roland Borsa
Voivode of Transylvania
1283
Succeeded by
Roland Borsa
Preceded by
Thomas Hont-Pázmány
Judge royal
1293–1297
Succeeded by
Stephen Ákos
Preceded by
Amade Aba
Nicholas Kőszegi
Palatine of Hungary
alongside Roland Rátót

1298–1299
Succeeded by
Amade Aba
Preceded by
several office-holders
Palatine of Hungary
alongside others

1304–1307
Succeeded by
several office-holders