Apple soup

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Apple soup
AppleCheddarSoupAppleKimcheeCheddarTofu (8324582211).jpg
An apple soup
Type Soup
Course Appetizer
Main ingredients Apples, onions, chicken or vegetable broth or water or apple cider
Cookbook: Apple soup  Media: Apple soup

Apple soup is a soup prepared using apples as a primary ingredient. The apples can be puréed, sliced, or boiled and used whole.[1] Onions, carrots, parsnip and pumpkin are used in some preparations.[2][3][4][5] Some recipes use chicken or vegetable broth or stock, while some others use water or apple cider.[6] Additional ingredients can be added according to taste, such as cinnamon, lemon juice, sugar, ginger, curry powder, salt and pepper.[1][6] It is sometimes served as an appetizer.[7]

Apple soup has been used as a dish to feed the sick, as occurred circa the early 1900s in the United States.[8]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Rumble, V.R. (2009). Soup Through the Ages: A Culinary History with Period Recipes. McFarland & Company, Incorporated. p. 199. ISBN 978-0-7864-5390-0. 
  2. ^ Phillips, D. (2014). The Gourmet Jewish Cookbook: More Than 200 Recipes from Around the World. St. Martin's Press. p. 21. ISBN 978-1-250-04593-5. 
  3. ^ Atlas, N. (2009). Vegan Soups and Hearty Stews for All Seasons. Potter/TenSpeed/Harmony. p. 32. ISBN 978-0-7679-3167-0. 
  4. ^ Johnson, M.M.; Hirsheimer, C. (2003). The New Irish Table: 70 Contemporary Recipes. Chronicle Books. p. 37. ISBN 978-0-8118-3387-5. 
  5. ^ Peterson, J. (2009). Farmer John's Cookbook. Gibbs Smith, Publisher. p. 288. ISBN 978-1-4236-1411-1. 
  6. ^ a b Yonan, Joe (December 28, 2015). "Hot or cold, an apple soup that's New Year's party-worthy". Washington Post. Retrieved March 28, 2017. 
  7. ^ Ojakangas, B. (2013). The Soup & Bread Cookbook: More Than 100 Seasonal Pairings for Simple, Satisfying Meals. Rodale Books. p. 176. ISBN 978-1-60961-362-4. 
  8. ^ Roper, C.C.L. (1914). Scientific Feeding. R.S. Kitchener, printer. pp. 237–238.