Approval Voting Party

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Approval Voting Party
ChairpersonFrank Atwood[1]
Presidential nomineeBlake Huber
Vice-presidential nomineeFrank Atwood
Membership (July 1, 2020)1,777[2]
IdeologyVoting reform
Website
approvalvotingparty.com

The Approval Voting Party (AVP) is a single-issue American political party dedicated to implementing approval voting in the United States.[3] In 2019, the party became recognized as a minor party in Colorado.

History[edit]

Frank Atwood in 2016
Approval Voting Party ballot access during the 2020 presidential election

The Approval Voting Party was co-founded by Blake Huber and Frank Atwood.[4] The party ran Huber for the position of Colorado Secretary of State in 2018.[5] In October 2019, the party received minor party status in Colorado after surpassing 1,000 registered members.[6]

In 2019, Atwood, a member of the Littleton, Colorado election commission, attempted to pass a measure approval voting used in non-partisan municipal elections within that. The election commission voted to send the measure to the city council, however, the city council voted 4-3 against the measure.[7]

Presidential elections[edit]

2016 presidential campaign[edit]

During the 2016 presidential election, Frank Atwood served as the AVP's presidential nominee and Blake Huber as its vice-presidential nominee. Atwood and Huber only appeared on the ballot in Colorado, receiving 337 votes.[7][8][9]

2020 presidential campaign[edit]

On March 8, 2020, four delegates voted to give Huber the presidential nomination and Atwood the vice-presidential nomination at a meeting in Sheridan, Colorado.[10] Huber and Atwood are currently on the ballot in Vermont and Colorado.[11][12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Colorado Political Party Directory". Secretary of State of Colorado.
  2. ^ "Colorado Total Registered Voters By Party Affiliation and Status" (PDF). Secretary of State of Colorado. July 1, 2020.
  3. ^ Luning, Ernst (October 2, 2019). "Colorado's Approval Voting Party achieves minor party status". Colorado Politics. Archived from the original on August 20, 2020. Retrieved August 8, 2020.
  4. ^ Fleming, Sara (October 15, 2019). "Approval Voting Party Gains Minor Party Status — But It Doesn't Want Your Votes". Westword. Archived from the original on August 20, 2020. Retrieved August 8, 2020.
  5. ^ Winger, Richard (September 5, 2018). "Approval Voting Party Hopes to Become Ballot-Qualified in Colorado". Ballot Access News. Retrieved August 8, 2020.
  6. ^ Winger, Richard (October 4, 2019). "Approval Voting Party Becomes Ballot-Qualified in Colorado". Ballot Access News. Archived from the original on August 20, 2020. Retrieved August 8, 2020.
  7. ^ a b Gilbert, David (October 4, 2019). "Making a case for a different way to vote". Littleton Independent. Archived from the original on August 20, 2020. Retrieved August 8, 2020.
  8. ^ Marcus, Peter (October 1, 2016). "A grand and 9 friends can get you on Colorado ballot". The Durango Herald. Archived from the original on August 20, 2020. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  9. ^ "2016 presidential election results in Colorado". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. September 14, 2002. Archived from the original on August 20, 2020.
  10. ^ Winger, Richard (June 11, 2020). "Approval Voting Party Chooses Presidential and Vice-Presidential Nominees". Ballot Access News. Archived from the original on August 20, 2020. Retrieved August 8, 2020.
  11. ^ Winger, Richard (August 20, 2020). "Vermont Posts General Election Candidate List; Will Have 22 Presidential Candidates on Ballot". Ballot Access News. Archived from the original on August 20, 2020.
  12. ^ "2020 General Election Candidate List in Colorado". Secretary of State of Colorado. Archived from the original on August 20, 2020.