April 1934

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The following events occurred in April 1934:

April 1, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

April 2, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

April 3, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • A court in Duisburg, Germany ruled that "the Catholic press has no right to exist." The ruling was made in connection with an unfair competition lawsuit brought by a company that published several small Catholic newspapers against a rival Nazi paper that was accused of securing subscriptions through intimidation.[6]
  • Born: Jane Goodall, primatologist, in London, England

April 4, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

April 5, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

April 6, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

  • 6,000 unemployed people rioted in Minneapolis. A parade of the jobless seeking an extension of the Civil Works Administration marched to City Hall and in sent a committee to see the city council, but after word got out that the committee had been arrested the demonstration turned violent. Police moved in with tear gas and clubs and a total of 18 were injured, 13 of them law enforcement.[9]
  • The drama film Men in White starring Clark Gable and Myrna Loy was released.[10]
  • Born: Anton Geesink, judo champion, in Utrecht, Netherlands (d. 2010)

April 7, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

April 8, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

April 9, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

  • Pope Pius XI received 80 foreign correspondents at the Vatican, the first time the press had ever been invited to meet a pope. The pope said the occasion was to thank the press because "this holy year has been magnificent and successful, and a great part of the resonance it has had throughout the world was due to you and what you wrote about it."[13]
  • Born: Bill Birch, politician, in Hastings, New Zealand

April 10, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

April 11, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

April 12, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

April 13, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

April 14, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

April 15, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

  • The King and Queen of Italy inaugurated Sabaudia, the second city to be built on the newly drained Pontine Marshes. Littoria, founded in 1932, was the first.[21]
  • A police raid on a secluded villa in Barbizon, France revealed that Leon Trotsky had been secretly living there for the past few months and not in Corsica as he was supposed to. Trotsky said he had been living there in secrecy because he feared attempts on his life. The villa attracted suspicion because of the large volume of mail it had been receiving.[22][23]
  • Died: Karl Dane, 47, Danish-American comedian and actor (suicide)

April 16, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

April 17, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • On Budget Day in the United Kingdom, Chancellor of the Exchequer Neville Chamberlain presented a "prosperity budget" that rolled back many previous tax increases and service cuts while still projecting a surplus of £800,000.[24]
  • The newly refurbished Fenway Park opened in Boston. Seating capacity was increased and the mound known as Duffy's Cliff along the left-field wall had been leveled, a scoreboard installed at the base of the wall in its place. The entire park gained its distinctive shade of green at this time, although the left-field wall later to be famously nicknamed the Green Monster would remain covered in advertisements until 1947.[25]

April 18, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

April 19, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

April 20, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

April 21, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

April 22, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

April 23, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

April 24, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

April 25, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

April 26, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

  • American railroad owners and workers averted a strike by reaching a settlement to gradually roll back the 10 percent pay cut imposed on the workers two years earlier.[41]
  • Died: John Hamilton, 34 or 35, Canadian criminal (died of gunshot wounds; some sources give date of death as April 27 or 30)

April 27, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

  • German foreign minister Konstantin von Neurath gave a press conference denouncing France for "destroying at a single blow the result of lengthy negotiations for disarmament", calling it amazing that France would spend 16 billion francs on its military and express alarm at Germany's defense expenditure of 890 million reichsmarks.[42]
  • Died: Joe Vila, 67, American sportswriter and editor

April 28, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

April 29, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

April 30, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

  • The remnants of Austrian parliament, down to 74 members because the 73 members of the Social Democratic Party were all either imprisoned or in hiding, held its first session in over a year. By a vote of 72-2 the parliament approved a new constitution turning the country into a dictatorship.[45]
  • The independent American film Hitler's Reign of Terror, an anti-Nazi film composed of newsreel footage and re-enactments, premiered at the Mayfair in New York City.
  • Born: Don McKenney, ice hockey player, in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Insull Tried; Held for U. S.". Chicago Daily Tribune. April 2, 1934. p. 1. 
  2. ^ "Tageseinträge für 1. April 1934". chroniknet. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  3. ^ Speck, Eugene (April 3, 1934). "Insull in Jail; Held for U. S.". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  4. ^ "Catholics End Holy Year; Wall Up Door Till 1950". Chicago Daily Tribune. April 3, 1934. p. 8. 
  5. ^ "Nazis Encourage Paganism, Pope Warns Germans". Chicago Daily Tribune. April 3, 1934. p. 8. 
  6. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (April 4, 1934). "Catholic Press Has No Right to Live, Nazis Rule". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 14. 
  7. ^ "Chronology 1934". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Fascist Court Victory Brings Rumanian Crisis". Chicago Daily Tribune. April 6, 1934. p. 19. 
  9. ^ "18 Are Injured in Minneapolis City Hall Riot". Chicago Daily Tribune. April 7, 1934. p. 1. 
  10. ^ a b Slowik, Michael (2014). After the Silents: Hollywood Film Music in the Early Sound Era, 1926–1934. Columbia University Press. p. 308. ISBN 978-0-231-16582-2. 
  11. ^ Furseth, Astor (1985): Dommedagsfjellet. Tafjord 1934. Oslo: Gyldendal.
  12. ^ Taylor, Edmond (April 9, 1934). "Fascists Fight Reds in Paris; Women in Fray". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  13. ^ Darrah, David (April 10, 1934). "Pope Pays Press High Tribute; Blesses Writers". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 13. 
  14. ^ Ettlinger, Harold (April 11, 1934). "Assassins Fire on Chieftain of Spanish Fascisti". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 16. 
  15. ^ Hinton, David B. (2000). The Films of Leni Riefenstahl. Lanham: Scarecrow Press. p. 24. ISBN 978-1-57886-009-8. 
  16. ^ "Airmen Rescuer Last Castaway on Floating Ice". Chicago Daily Tribune. April 13, 1934. p. 9. 
  17. ^ Wiktor, Christian L. (1998). Multilateral Treaty Calendar, 1648–1995. The Hague: Kluwer Law International. p. 342. ISBN 978-90-411-0584-4. 
  18. ^ "Plain Talking By President In His New Book". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. April 12, 1934. p. 4. 
  19. ^ Speck, Eugene (April 14, 1934). "Insull as U.S. Prisoner Sails for Trial Here". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  20. ^ "Divorce Ends Talmadge and Schenck Knot". Chicago Daily Tribune. April 15, 1934. p. 1. 
  21. ^ "Italian Rulers Open New City Born in Swamp". Chicago Daily Tribune. April 16, 1934. p. 4. 
  22. ^ "Raid Near Paris Bares Secret Trotzky Home". Chicago Daily Tribune. April 16, 1934. p. 1. 
  23. ^ Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 439. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3. 
  24. ^ Steele, John (April 18, 1934). "Economies Bring Britain Relief; Taxes Reduced". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 6. 
  25. ^ Wilson, Susan (2003). Boston Sites and Insights: An Essential Guide to Historic Landmarks in and around Boston. Boston: Beacon Press. p. 152. ISBN 978-0-8070-7135-9. 
  26. ^ "Tageseinträge für 18. April 1934". chroniknet. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  27. ^ "France Charges Trotsky with Plot to Set Up Dictatorship". Chicago Daily Tribune. April 19, 1934. p. 2. 
  28. ^ "1934". MusicAndHistory. Archived from the original on August 28, 2012. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  29. ^ "Austria Sends Jailed Socialists to Prison Camp 'Indefinitely'". Chicago Daily Tribune. April 20, 1934. p. 14. 
  30. ^ "Boston Marathon Yearly Synopses (1897–2013)". John Hancock Financial. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  31. ^ Reid, John Howard (2005). Your Colossal Main Feature Plus Full Support Program. p. 165. ISBN 978-1-4116-2909-7. 
  32. ^ Manvell, Roger; Fraenkel, Heinrick (2011). Goering: The Rise and Fall of the Notorious Nazi Leader. Skyhorse Publishing. p. 108. ISBN 978-1-84832-600-2. 
  33. ^ "The Broadway Parade". Film Daily. New York: Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc.: 6 April 16, 1934. 
  34. ^ "150 Miners Die in Blast; 250 Trapped in Pit". Chicago Daily Tribune. April 22, 1934. p. 2. 
  35. ^ Blake, Matt (August 3, 2012). "'The most convincing Nessie photograph ever': Skipper claims to have finally found proof that Loch Ness Monster exists". Daily Mail. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  36. ^ a b "April 1934". JohnDillinger.com. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  37. ^ "Double Tracked Tunnel 12 Miles Long Put in Use". Chicago Daily Tribune. April 23, 1934. p. 9. 
  38. ^ "Tageseinträge für 23. April 1934". chroniknet. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  39. ^ "Spain's Cabinet Quits; Nation Placed in "State of Alarm"". Chicago Daily Tribune. April 26, 1934. p. 2. 
  40. ^ "Find Kidnaped Girl in Cave". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 15, 1934. p. 1. 
  41. ^ "Avert Railway Strike; Reach Accord on Pay". Chicago Daily Tribune. April 27, 1934. p. 1. 
  42. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (April 28, 1934). "German Foreign Chief Charges France Ruined Plan to Disarm". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 11. 
  43. ^ Darrah, David (April 29, 1934). "King of Italy Backs Big Army to Prevent War". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  44. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (April 30, 1934). "Nazis Ban Three Catholic Papers in Youth Row". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 10. 
  45. ^ "Democracy Dies in Austria; Diet Ends Existence". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 1, 1934. p. 12.