April 2005 in science

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2005
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
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03 04 05 06 07 08 09
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17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Deaths[edit]

• 22 – Philip Morrison

Events[edit]

Related pages[edit]

Other Years in Sci Tech

April 29, 2005[edit]

April 28, 2005[edit]

April 27, 2005[edit]

April 25, 2005[edit]

  • By applying a small charge to bacteria in a hydrogen biomass generator, environmental engineers at Penn State have increased its output fourfold. Producing energy while cleaning water could lead to a significant reduction in the cost of treating wastewater. (Penn State Live)

April 24, 2005[edit]

April 21, 2005[edit]

April 19, 2005[edit]

April 18, 2005[edit]

April 16, 2005[edit]

  • The NASA autonomous DART spacecraft failed to complete its mission because of lack of fuel and "retires" itself. (BBC)

April 15, 2005[edit]

April 14, 2005[edit]

April 13, 2005[edit]

April 12, 2005[edit]

April 11, 2005[edit]

April 8, 2005[edit]

April 7, 2005[edit]

  • Sony has patented an idea of transmitting data directly to the brain. (PhysOrg)
  • The space shuttle Discovery is rolled onto its launch platform, in time for a launch in May for the first launch of shuttle since January 2003. A crack was found in the fuel tank's foam insulation, however NASA officials say that it will not prevent the mission. (BBC)
  • Researchers at the University of Colorado at Boulder have created a new model of the Earth's early atmosphere. The model indicates up to 40 percent of the early atmosphere was hydrogen, under these high-hydrogen conditions the formation of organic compounds like amino acids, and ultimately life are more likely. (EurekAlert!)
  • The IUCN announced that one in four-of the 625 primate species and subspecies are at risk of extinction. (EurekAlert!)

April 6, 2005[edit]

April 5, 2005[edit]

April 4, 2005[edit]

  • The Vlog channel -- To kick off product re-branding and positioning efforts, Al Gore and Joel Hyatt appear at the NCTA convention and announce a new TV network, "Current." Current will be a national network "created by, for and with an 18-34 year-old audience." Formerly known as INdTV, Current is the same idea but with Google branding. (Yahoo!)

April 1, 2005[edit]