Aprobarbital

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Aprobarbital
Aprobarbital Structural Formulae.svg
Aprobarbital ball-and-stick animation.gif
Clinical data
Other namesaprobarbital, Oramon, allylpropymal, Alurate, 5-isopropyl- 5-allylbarbituric acid
AHFS/Drugs.comInternational Drug Names
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
Identifiers
  • 5-propan-2-yl-5-prop-2-enyl-1,3-diazinane-2,4,6-trione
CAS Number
PubChem CID
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
ECHA InfoCard100.000.908 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC10H14N2O3
Molar mass210.233 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • O=C1NC(=O)NC(=O)C1(C(C)C)C\C=C
  • InChI=1S/C10H14N2O3/c1-4-5-10(6(2)3)7(13)11-9(15)12-8(10)14/h4,6H,1,5H2,2-3H3,(H2,11,12,13,14,15) checkY
  • Key:UORJNBVJVRLXMQ-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  (verify)

Aprobarbital (or aprobarbitone), sold as Oramon, Somnifaine, and Allonal, is a barbiturate derivative invented in the 1920s by Ernst Preiswerk. It has sedative, hypnotic and anticonvulsant properties, and was used primarily for the treatment of insomnia.[1] Aprobarbital was never as widely used as more common barbiturate derivatives such as phenobarbital and is now rarely prescribed as it has been replaced by newer drugs with a better safety margin.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Reddemann H, Türk E (May 1966). "[Oramon poisoning in infancy and childhood. Observations on 12 aprobarbital poisonings]". Das Deutsche Gesundheitswesen (in German). 21 (19): 878–81. PMID 5973760.