Aquila Italiana

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Aquila Italiana
Industry Automotive
Fate ceased production, taken over by the SPA
Founded 1906
Defunct 1917
Headquarters Turin, Italy
Products Automobiles
Aquila Italiana 25/30 HP (1912)

The Aquila Italiana founded as the "Società Anonima Aquila" and quickly renamed as "Società Anonima Italiana Aquila" was an Italian automobile manufacturer from 1906 to 1917. The company was named again in 1909 after it was bough by bank as "Aquila Anonima Italiana di L. Marsaglia", the Marsaglia part came from the name of bank owner's son Vincenzo Marsaglia, talented automobile driver.

Designed by Giulio Cesare Cappa, the cars were big four- and six-cylinder models with ioe engines of an advanced type. There was an interruption in construction after 1908, but the company introduced new models in 1911; these featured 4192 cc six-cylinder engines and proved to be successful in many races. Among Aquila Italiana drivers were Meo Constantini (later to join Bugatti at Molsheim, where he became first a racing driver and later the Chef d'Equipe) and Carlo Masetti (count Giulio Masetti's elder brother).

Production[edit]

The company Aquila Italiana produced a total of approximately 1,500 copies of its cars, all models combined.

Technical specifications
Cars produced by "Aquila Anonima Italiana di L. Marsaglia"
Type 15/20 HP 40/50 HP 25/30 HP K-12/15 HP H4-20/30 HP H6-35/50
Displacement 2,797 cc (170.7 cu in) 7,432 cc (453.5 cu in) 3,921 cc (239.3 cu in) 1,847 cc (112.7 cu in) 2,614 cc (159.5 cu in) 3,921 cc (239.3 cu in)
Cylinders 4 4 6 4 4 6
Bore mm 90 130 80 70 80 80
Stroke mm 110 140 130 120 130 130
rpm 1500 1200 3600 2000 1800 1800
Valves Side Side Mixed At the top At the top At the top
Ignition magneto magneto magneto magneto magneto magneto
Gears 4+ RM 4+ RM 4+ RM 4+ RM 4+ RM 4 + RM
Transmission cardan cardan cardan cardan cardan cardan
Wheelbase 2,500 mm (98.4 in) 2,900 mm (114.2 in) 3,055 mm (120.3 in) 2,600 mm (102.4 in) 2,850 mm (112.2 in) 3,050 mm (120.1 in)
Track 1,250 mm (49.2 in) 1,400 mm (55.1 in) 1,445 mm (56.9 in) 1,300 mm (51.2 in) 1,440 mm (56.7 in) 1,440 mm (56.7 in)
Production 1909-11 1909-11 1909-12 1913-17 1912-17 1913-17

See also[edit]

External links[edit]