Arab Socialist Movement

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Arab Socialist Movement
حركة الاشتراكيين العرب
Founder Akram al-Hawrani
Founded 5 January 1950 (5 January 1950)
Headquarters Damascus, Syria
Ideology Arab socialism
Arab nationalism
Pan-Arabism
Political position Left-wing
National affiliation National Progressive Front
National Democratic Rally
National Coordination Committee for Democratic Change
Cabinet of Syria
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The Arab Socialist Movement (Arabic: حركة الاشتراكيين العرب‎- Harakat Al-Ishtirakiyeen Al-'Arab) also known as Arab Socialist Party, was a political party in Syria that has split into several factions since the 1960s which continue to use the same name.

History[edit]

The original party traced its roots back to the 1930s radical anti-capitalist, pan-Arab group led by Akram al-Hawrani,[1] but was formally established on 5 January 1950.[citation needed] It merged with the Ba'ath Party in 1953,[2] only to withdraw again in 1963.[3] It then split into several factions:

  • One, led by Abdul-Ghani Qannout joined the Ba'ath Party-led National Progressive Front government in 1972[4][5] and has continued to support the al-Assad family's rule ever since. After Abdul-Ghani Qannout died in 2001, Ahmad al-Ahmad (died 2016) became the new secretary general; under him, the party continued its pro-government course, even during the Syrian Civil War. In course of this conflict, a member of the Arab Socialist Movement's political office, Turki Albu Hamad, formed the "Forces of the Fighters of the Tribes" militia.[3]
  • Another splinter group was led by the former officer Abdul-Ghani Ayyash (died 2010), and joined the opposition in form of the National Democratic Rally.[1]
  • One faction of Marxists, led by Akram al-Bunni, split off and formed the "National Council of Damascus Declaration for National Democratic Change", which was suppressed by the Assad government.[6]
  • Another branch has also gained legal recognition and parliamentary representation, but under the name "National Vow Movement".[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Akram al-Bunni (2013), p. 8.
  2. ^ Seale 1990, p. 65.
  3. ^ a b Aymenn Jawad Al-Tamimi (2 April 2017). "Quwat Muqatili al-Asha'ir: Tribal Auxiliary Forces of the Military Intelligence". Retrieved 31 August 2017. 
  4. ^ Seale 1990, pp. 175, 176.
  5. ^ Akram al-Bunni (2013), pp. 5, 8.
  6. ^ Akram al-Bunni (2013), p. 6.

Bibliography[edit]