Arado Ar 76

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Ar 76
Arado Ar 76 Model pic.JPG
Model of the Ar 76
Role Fighter
Manufacturer Arado
Designer Walter Blume[1]
First flight 1934[1]
Introduction 1936
Primary user Luftwaffe
Number built 189[2]

The Arado Ar 76 was a German aircraft of the 1930s, designed as a light fighter with a secondary role as an advanced trainer in mind.[1]

Development[edit]

Arado's response to a requirement by the Reichsluftfahrtministerium (RLM) for a light / emergency fighter aircraft, was the Ar 76 which was evaluated against the Heinkel He 74, Focke-Wulf Fw 56, the Henschel Hs 121 and Hs 125 in 1935. Although the Fw 56 was selected for the main production contract, the RLM was sufficiently impressed by the Ar 76 to order a small number of production aircraft as well.[1]

Design[edit]

The Ar 76 was a parasol-wing monoplane with fixed, tailwheel undercarriage. The wings were constructed of fabric-covered wood, and the fuselage was fabric-covered steel tube.[1]

Operational history[edit]

Production Ar 76A aircraft were used by Jagdfliegerschulen (fighter pilot schools) from 1936.[1]

Variants[edit]

Data from:[1]

Ar 76a
First prototype, (regn. D-ISEN).
Ar 76 V2
Second prototype, (regn. D-IRAS).
Ar 76 V3
Third prototype.
Ar 76A
Single-seat advanced trainer, lightweight fighter aircraft. Built in small numbers.

Operators[edit]

 Germany

Specifications (Ar 76A-0)[edit]

Data from Aircraft of the Third Reich[1], Flugzeug Typenbuch 1936[3]

General characteristics

  • Crew: one
  • Length: 7.2 m (23 ft 7 in)
  • Wingspan: 9.50 m (31 ft 2 in)
  • Height: 2.55 m (8 ft 4 in)
  • Wing area: 13.34 m2 (143.6 sq ft)
  • Aspect ratio: 6.5
  • Empty weight: 751 kg (1,656 lb)
  • Gross weight: 1,072 kg (2,363 lb)
  • Fuel capacity: main tank:105 l (28 US gal; 23 imp gal); oil tank:12 l (3.2 US gal; 2.6 imp gal)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Argus As 10C inverted V-8 air-cooled piston engine
  • Propellers: 2-bladed wooden fixed pitch propeller

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 267 km/h (166 mph; 144 kn)
  • Cruise speed: 221 km/h (137 mph; 119 kn)
  • Landing Speed: 100 km/h (62 mph; 54 kn)
  • Range: 470 km (292 mi; 254 nmi)
  • Endurance: 2 hr 24 minutes
  • Service ceiling: 6,400 m (21,000 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 7.2 m/s (1,420 ft/min)
  • Time to altitude: 1,000 m (3,300 ft) in 2.5 minutes
  • Fuel consumption: 21 l (5.5 US gal; 4.6 imp gal) / 100 km (54 nmi; 62 mi)
  • Oil consumption: 0.8 l (0.21 US gal; 0.18 imp gal) / 100 km (54 nmi; 62 mi)

Armament

  • Guns: 2 × 7.92 mm (0.312 in) MG 17 machine guns with 250 rounds per gun
  • Bombs: 2 × 10 kg (22 lb) SC 10 fragmentation bombs

See also[edit]

Related lists

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Green, William (2010). Aircraft of the Third Reich (1st ed.). London. p. 35. ISBN 978 1 900732 06 2. 
  2. ^ Federal Archive/Military Archive Freiburg, production programs RL 3
  3. ^ Schneider, Helmut (1936). Flugzeug-Typenbuch 1936 (pdf) (in German) (1936 ed.). Leipzig: Herm. Beyer Verlag. p. 11. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Green, William (2010). Aircraft of the Third Reich (1st ed.). London. p. 35. ISBN 978 1 900732 06 2. 
  • Green, William (1972). Warplanes of the Third Reich. New York: Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-05782-2. 
  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. p. 71. 
  • World Aircraft Information Files. Brightstar Aerospace Publishing, London. File 889 Sheet 69.