Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Amalfi-Cava de' Tirreni

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Archdiocese of Amalfi-Cava de' Tirreni
Archidioecesis Amalphitana-Cavensis
Amalfi BW 2013-05-15 10-09-21.jpg
Façade of the Duomo of Amalfi
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical province Salerno-Campagna-Acerno
Statistics
Area 150 km2 (58 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2015)
101,396
100,743 (99.4%)
Parishes 79
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 6th Century
Cathedral Cattedrale di S. Andrea Apostolo
Secular priests 61 (diocesan)
23 (Religious Orders)
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Archbishop Orazio Soricelli
Website
www.diocesiamalficava.it
Cloisters in the Duomo of Amalfi.

The Archdiocese of Amalfi-Cava de' Tirreni (Latin: Archidioecesis Amalphitana-Cavensis) is a Roman Catholic archbishopric, which has its archiepiscopal see at Amalfi, not far from Naples. It was named Archdiocese of Amalfi until parts of the Diocese of Cava e Sarno were merged with it on September 30, 1986.[1][2]

It was exempt, i.e. directly dependent on the Holy See, but is now a suffragan of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Salerno-Campagna-Acerno.

The current titular is Orazio Soricelli. In 2015, in the diocese of Amalfi there was one priest for every 1,199 Catholics.

Special churches[edit]

Amalfi Cathedral, the cathedral archiepiscopal see, is in Amalfi, devoted to St. Andrew Apostle. It also has

History[edit]

The early beginnings of the Diocese of Amalfi are very obscure; it is not known when it was founded, or when Christianity reached it. That it was early is a reasonable conjecture, considering the facilities for communication with the East which the South of Italy possessed.

The first positive indication that Amalfi was a Christian community is supplied by Pope Gregory the Great, who wrote in January 596 to the Subdeacon Antemius, his legate and administrator in Campania, ordering him to constrain within a monastery Primenus, Bishop of Amalfi, because he did not remain in his diocese, but roamed about.[3] The regular list of bishops began in 829.

It was raised to Metropolitan Archbishopric of Amalfi by Pope John XV in 987, having lost territory to establish the dioceses of Capri, Lettere, Minori and Scala.

In 1206, it Gained territory from the suppressed Nuceria. And after the completion, also in 1206, of the Cathedral of St. Andrew (Duomo), the relics of the Apostle of that name, who was the patron saint of Amalfi, were taken from Constantinople and brought there by Cardinal Pietro of Capua, an Amalfitan who took part in the sack of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade.

On 10 October 1384 it lost territory to establish the Diocese of Nuceria

On 27 June 1818 it was demoted as non-metropolitan Archdiocese of Amalfi, despite aving gained territories from the suppressed bishorpics of Minori and Roman Catholic Diocese of Ravello–Scala&Ravello–Scala.

The archbishopric had in the early 20th century about 36,000 inhabitants, 54 parishes and 279 secular priests.

On 30 September 1986 the diocese was renamed the Archdiocese of Amalfi–Cava de’ Tirreni, having gained territory from and absorbing the title of the suppressed Cava de’ Tirreni.

On 20 August 2012 it gained territory from the Territorial Abbacy of Santissima Trinità di Cava de’ Tirreni.

Bishops and Archbishops[edit]

Diocese of Amalfi[edit]

Erected: 6th Century
Latin Name: Amalphitana

...
  • Pimenius (596)[4]
...
  • Petrus (879)[5]
  • Orso (897 – 920)[6]
  • Giacinto (925 – 936?)
  • Costantino (947 – 960)
  • Mastalo (960 – 987?)

Archdiocese of Amalfi[edit]

Elevated: 987
Latin Name: Amalphitana

to 1200[edit]

  • Leo (Leone Orso Comite) (987 – 1029)[7]
  • Leone (1029 – 1050)[8]
  • Pietro Alferio (1050 – 1070?)[9]
  • Giovanni (1070 – 1082)
  • Sergio Donnamira (1082 – 1102)
  • Mauro De Monte (1103 – 1128) [10]
  • Giovanni della Porta (ca. 1130–1142)[11]
  • Giovanni (1142 – 1166)[12]
  • Giovanni di San Paolo (1166 – 1168)
  • Roboaldo (1168 – 1174)[13]
  • Dionisio (1174 – 1202)[14]

1200 to 1400[edit]

  • Matteo Capuano (1202 – 1215)[15]
  • Giovanni Capuano (1215 – 1239)
  • Bartolomeo Pignatelli (1254 – 1254.11.04)[16]
  • Gualtiero de’ Gualtieri (1254.11.10 – 1258)[17]
  • Filippo Augustariccio (1258 – 1291?)
  • Andrea d’Alagno (1295 – 1330)
  • Landolfo Caracciolo, O.F.M. Conv.? (1331.09.20 – 1350?)[18]
  • Pietro Capuano (1351 – 1362?)
  • Marino del Giudice (1361.04.16 – 1373.05.18[19]
  • Giovanni Acquaviva (1375.01.01 – 1378);[20]
  • Bertrand Mormillis (7 February 1379 – 1385) (appointed by Pope Clement VII of the Avignon Obedience)[21]
  • Sergius Grisoni (1379–1392) (appointed by Urban VI of the Roman Obedience).
  • Nicolaus de Sora (1385–1393) (appointed by Boniface IX of the Roman Obedience).[22]
  • Paulus de Surrento (1393–1401) (appointed by Boniface IX of the Roman Obedience).[23]

1400 to 1600[edit]

  • Bertrandus de Alaneo (1401–1412) (appointed by Boniface IX of the Roman Obedience).
  • Robertus de Branchea (1413–1423) (appointed by John XXIII of the Avignon-Roman-Pisan Obedience).
  • Andrea de Palearea (28 June 1424 – 1449) (appointed by Pope Martin V, elected by the Cardinals and others at the Council of Constance).
  • Antonio Carlini, O.P. (1449–1460 Died)[24]
  • Nicolaus Miroballo[25] (1460–1472 Died)
Sede vacante

1600 to 1818[edit]

Since 1818[edit]

Territory Added: 1818 from the suppressed Diocese of Minori
Territory Added: 1818 from the suppressed Diocese of Scala

  • Mariano Bianco (1831–1848 Retired)
  • Domenico Ventura[42] (1849–1862 Died)
  • Francesco Antonio Maiorsini (1871–1893 Died)
  • Enrico de Dominis (Dominicis) (1894–1908 Died)
  • Antonio Maria Bonito (1908–1910 Resigned)
  • Angelo Maria Dolci (1911–1914 Appointed, Titular Archbishop of Hierapolis in Syria)
  • Ercolano Marini (1915–1945 Retired)
  • Luigi Martinelli (1946–1946 Died)
  • Angelo Rossini (1947–1965 Died)
  • Alfredo Vozzi (1972–1982 Retired)
  • Ferdinando Palatucci (1982–1990 Retired)

Archdiocese of Amalfi-Cava de' Tirreni[edit]

United on 30 September 1986 with the Diocese of Cava e Sarno

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archdiocese of Amalfi-Cava de' Tirreni" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved October 7, 2016
  2. ^ "Archdiocese of Amalfi-Cava de' Tirreni" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved October 7, 2016
  3. ^ Reg., V, xiv; cf. Jaffé, Regesta Pontificum Romanorum, 1403.
  4. ^ Pimenius is mentioned in a letter of Pope Gregory I: Kehr, p. 388, no. 1. Ughelli, pp. 189-190. J.P, Migne (ed.) Patrologiae Latinae cursus completus Tomus 77 (Paris 1862), p. 813 (Epistolarum Liber VI, 23).
  5. ^ Petrus and others were recipients of an order of Pope John VIII: Kehr, p. 388, no. 2. Ughelli, p. 190.
  6. ^ Ughelli, p. 192.
  7. ^ Kehr, p. 388, no. 6.
  8. ^ Kehr, p. 388, no. 7.
  9. ^ Bishop Petrus was one of the legates sent by Pope Leo IX to the Emperor Constantine Monomachos: Kehr, pp. 389-390, no. 8.
  10. ^ Bishop Mauro had previously been Bishop of Minori (1092? – 1103). In 1112 he was sent as a legate to the Emperor Alexius: Kehr, p. 390-391, no. 10.
  11. ^ Giovanni della Porta was a native of Salerno. Giovanni's election was recognized by Pope Anacletus II: Kehr, p. 391, no. 14. Ughelli, p. 202.
  12. ^ A priest of Benevento, Giovanni was elected with the consent of King Roger of Sicily, and was consecrated in Rome by Pope Innocent II. He consecrated the church of S. Nicholas in 1161. Ughelli, pp. 202-204.
  13. ^ A native of Lombady, Roboald had been a chaplain of King Roger of Sicily and a Canon of Palermo. He was consecrated by Pope Alexander III. Kehr, p. 392, no. 16.
  14. ^ Dionisio had previously been Bishop of Teramo (Italy) (1170 – 1174). He was consecrated and given the pallium by Pope Alexander III. He was present at the Lateran Council of 1179. J.D. Mansi, Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XXII (Venice 1778), p. 214. Kehr, p. 392, no. 19. Ughelli, p. 205.
  15. ^ He had been Archdeacon of Chieti. Eubel, I, p. 84
  16. ^ Pignatelli was later Metropolitan Archbishop of Cosenza (Italy) (1254.11.04 – 1266.09.30), Metropolitan Archbishop of Messina (Sicily, Italy) (1266.09.30 – death 1272)
  17. ^ Gualtieri had previously been Bishop of Larino (Italy) (? – 1254.11.10)
  18. ^ Caracciolo had previously been Bishop of Castellammare di Stabia (Italy) (1327.08.21 – 1331.09.20)
  19. ^ Del Judice had previously been Bishop of Teano (Italy) (1353.05.24 – 1361.04.16); later Bishop of Cassano all’Jonio (Italy) (1373.05.18 – 1379), Metropolitan Archbishop of Brindisi (Italy) (1379 – 1380.06.04), Apostolic Administrator of Imola (Italy) (1380 – 1382), Metropolitan Archbishop of Taranto (Italy) (1380.06.04 – 1386.01.11), Apostolic Administrator of Aversa (Italy) (1381.11.13 – 1386.01.11), created Cardinal-Priest of S. Pudenziana by Urban VI (1383 – death 1386.01.11), also Chamberlain of the Holy Roman Church of Reverend Apostolic Camera (1383 – 1386.01.11), Archpriest of Papal Basilica of St. Mary Major (1383 – 1386.01.11). He was murdered at Genoa on orders of Urban VI. Ughelli, pp. 233-235. Camera, pp. 257-261. Eubel, I, pp. 24, 84, 149, 170, 473, 480.
  20. ^ Acquaviva had previously been Bishop of Ascoli Piceno (Italy) (1369.10.22 – 1375.01.01); appointed Metropolitan Archbishop of Salerno (Italy) (24 November 1378 – 1382) in the Avignon Obedience. Eubel, I, p. 430.
  21. ^ Eubel, I, pp. 84 and 85.
  22. ^ Eubel, I, p. 85.
  23. ^ Bishop Paolo had previously been Bishop of Minori (1390–1393), appointed by Boniface IX of the Roman Obedience. Eubel, I, p. 344.
  24. ^ He was a Neapolitan, and held the degree of Master of theology. Ughelli, p. 241. Eubel, II, p. 86.
  25. ^ Archbishop Miroballo was a Doctor in utroque iure (Doctor of Civil and Canon Law), and served as an ambassador of Ferdinand I of Naples. He restored the archiepiscopal palace. Ughelli, pp. 241-243.
  26. ^ Eubel, II, p. 86; III, p. 105.
  27. ^ Lorenzo Pucci was Administrator of the diocese of Melfi (1513–1528), but he was also Papal Datary and lived in the Apostolic Palace in Rome. The diocese was only a benefice for him. He was named a Cardinal Priest by Pope Leo X on 23 September 1513. In 1524 he became suburbicarian Bishop of Albano. From 1520 to 1529 he was Major Penitentiary. Eubel, III, pp. 13, 55, 105; 241 and n. 3.
  28. ^ Eubel, III, p. 105.
  29. ^ Eubel, III, p. 237.
  30. ^ Filonardi had been a Canon of the Vatican Basilica, Referendary of the Two Signatures (1614), Nuncio in Naples (1616–1621). He died in Rome on 24 April 1624. Gauchat, IV, p. 80, with note 2.
  31. ^ Gauchat, IV, p. 80, with note 3.
  32. ^ Gauchat, IV, p. 80, with note 4.
  33. ^ Gauchat, IV, p. 80, with note 5.
  34. ^ Gauchat, IV, p. 80, with note 6.
  35. ^ Ritzler, V, p. 80 with note 3.
  36. ^ Ritzler, V, p. 80 with note 4.
  37. ^ Ritzler, V, p. 80 with note 5.
  38. ^ Scorza was Doctor in utroque iure (Doctor of Civil and Canon Law) (Sapienza 1704), and Vicar-General of the diocese of Recanati, of Fossombrone, and of Rimini. Scorza had previously been Bishop of Teramo (1724–1731); he was consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Lorenzo Corsini on 24 June 1724: Ritzler, V, p. 91, with note 6. Ritzler, VI, p. 78 with note 2.
  39. ^ A native of Naples, Cioffi was Doctor in utroque iure (Doctor of Civil and Canon Law) (Naples 1714). He had been Bishop of Sora (1744–1748); he was consecrated in Naples on 1 May 1744 by Cardinal Giuseppe Spinelli, Archbishop of Naples. Ritzler, VI, p. 78 with note 3; p. 384 with note 3.
  40. ^ Puoti was Doctor in utroque iure (Doctor of Civil and Canon Law) (Sapienza 1741). He served as Vicar-General in the diocese of Marsi (He was the nephew of the bishop), of Bitonto, and of Cava. He was elected Vicar Capitular of the Marsi on the death of his uncle. He was consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Giuseppe Spinelli on 26 November 1758. Ritzler, VI, p. 78 with note 4.
  41. ^ Master of theology. Superior of the Convento di S. Maria la Nova in Naples. Bishop of Scala-and-Ravello (1790–1804). He held a synod in Amalfi in 1816. Camera, pp. 450-452. Gams, p. 916.
  42. ^ A native of Bisceglia, Ventura had previously been Bishop of Termoli (1846–1849). Gams, pp. 848 and 933.

Sources[edit]

Reference Books[edit]

Studies[edit]

External links[edit]

  • Buonaiuti, Ernesto. "Amalfi." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1907. Retrieved: 2016-10-16
  • GigaCatholic, Archdiocese of Amalfi. Retrieved: 2016-10-16.

Acknowledgment[edit]

  •  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Amalfi". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton. 

Coordinates: 40°38′00″N 14°36′00″E / 40.6333°N 14.6000°E / 40.6333; 14.6000