Archbishop of Cardiff

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Archbishop of Cardiff
Archbishopric
catholic
Bishop George Stack 1.jpg
Incumbent:
George Stack
Province Province of Cardiff
Diocese Archdiocese of Cardiff
Cathedral St David's Cathedral, Cardiff
Formation 1916

The Archbishop of Cardiff is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cardiff.[1][2]

The archdiocese covers an area of 1,183 square miles (3,060 km2) and spans the historic counties of Monmouthshire, Herefordshire and eastern Glamorganshire. The Metropolitan See is in the city of Cardiff where the archbishop's seat is located at the Metropolitan Cathedral Church of St David.

With the exception of the second archbishop, Francis Mostyn, born in Flintshire and of local descent, the Welsh connections of the archbishops have been extremely weak. Ireland, London and the English provinces have supplied a majority.

The see is currently held by the Most Reverend George Stack, 7th Archbishop of Cardiff, who was appointed by the Holy See on 19 April 2011 and installed at St David's Cathedral, Cardiff on 20 June 2011.[3]

History[edit]

The Vicariate Apostolic of the Welsh District was created out of the Western District of England and Wales in 1840.[1] The Welsh District covered all of the principality of Wales and the English county of Herefordshire.[4] On the restoration of the Catholic hierarchy in England and Wales in 1850, the Welsh District was divided. The southern half became the Diocese of Newport and Menevia and the northern half became part of the Diocese of Shrewsbury.[1][5] In 1895, the diocese lost territory on the creation of the Vicariate Apostolic of Wales, which became the diocese of Menevia in 1898. As a result, the see changed its name to simply the diocese of Newport.[1][5] Following further reorganisation of the Catholic Church in Wales in 1916, the diocese of Newport was elevated to an ecclesiastical province and changed its name to the archdiocese of Cardiff. The archbishop has jurisdiction over the bishops of Menevia and Wrexham.[1]

Office holders[edit]

The following is a list of the archbishops of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cardiff and its precursor offices.[1]

Vicars Apostolic of the Welsh District[edit]

Vicars Apostolic of the Welsh District
From Until Incumbent Notes
1840 1850 Thomas Joseph Brown, O.S.B. Appointed Vicar Apostolic of the Wales District and Titular Bishop of Apollonia on 5 June 1840 and consecrated on 28 October 1840. Appointed Bishop of Newport and Menevia on 29 September 1850.[6]
In 1850, the southern half of the Welsh district became the diocese of Newport and Menevia.

Bishops of Newport and Menevia[edit]

In 1895, the episcopal title became simply the Bishop of Newport.[1][5]

Bishops of Newport and Menevia
From Until Incumbent Notes
1850 1880 Thomas Joseph Brown, O.S.B. Hitherto Vicar Apostolic of the Welsh District. Appointed Bishop of Newport and Menevia on 29 September 1850. Died in office on 12 April 1880.[6]
1881 1915 John Cuthbert Hedley, O.S.B. Formerly an auxiliary bishop of Newport and Menevia (1873–1881). Appointed bishop on 18 February 1881. His episcopal title changed to Bishop of Newport in 1895. Died in office on 11 November 1915.[7]
In 1916, the see was elevated to an archdiocese and changed its name to Cardiff.

Archbishops of Cardiff[edit]

Roman Catholic Archbishops of Cardiff
From Until Incumbent Notes
1916 1920 James Romanus Bilsborrow, O.S.B. Formerly Bishop of Port-Louis, Mauritius (1910–1916). Appointed archbishop on 7 February 1916. Resigned on 16 December 1920 and appointed Titular Archbishop of Cius. Died on 19 June 1931.[8]
1921 1939 Francis Edward Joseph Mostyn Formerly Bishop of Menevia (1898–1921). Appointed archbishop on 7 March 1921. Died in office on 25 October 1939.[9]
1940 1961 Michael Joseph McGrath Formerly Bishop of Menevia (1935–1940). Appointed archbishop on 20 June 1940. Died in office on 28 February 1961.[10]
1961 1983 John Aloysius Murphy Formerly Bishop of Shrewsbury (1949–1961). Appointed archbishop on 22 August 1961. Retired on 25 March 1983 and died on 18 November 1995.[11]
1983 2001 John Aloysius Ward, O.F.M. Cap. Formerly Bishop of Menevia (1981–1983). Appointed archbishop on 25 March 1983. Resigned on 26 October 2001 and died on 27 March 2007.[12]
2001 2010 Peter David Smith Formerly Bishop of East Anglia (1995–2001). Appointed archbishop on 26 October 2001. Translated to the archbishopric of Southwark on 10 June 2010.[13]
2011 present George Stack Formerly an auxiliary bishop of Westminster. Appointed archbishop on 19 April 2011 and installed on 20 June 2011.[3][14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Archdiocese of Cardiff. Catholic-Hierarchy. Retrieved 3 May 2010.
  2. ^ Metropolitan Archdiocese of Cardiff. GCatholic. Retrieved 3 May 2010.
  3. ^ a b "Archbishop George Stack". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved 22 November 2011. 
  4. ^ Brady 1876, The Episcopal Succession, volume 3, p. 424.
  5. ^ a b c Titular Episcopal See of Newport. GCatholic. Retrieved 3 May 2010.
  6. ^ a b "Bishop Thomas Joseph Brown, O.S.B.". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved 22 November 2011. 
  7. ^ "Bishop John Cuthbert Hedley, O.S.B.". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved 22 November 2011. 
  8. ^ "Archbishop James Romanus Bilsborrow, O.S.B.". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved 22 November 2011. 
  9. ^ "Archbishop Francis Edward Joseph Mostyn". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved 22 November 2011. 
  10. ^ "Archbishop Michael Joseph McGrath". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved 22 November 2011. 
  11. ^ "Archbishop John Aloysius Murphy". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved 22 November 2011. 
  12. ^ "Archbishop John Aloysius Ward, O.F.M. Cap.". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved 22 November 2011. 
  13. ^ "Archbishop Peter David Smith". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved 22 November 2011. 
  14. ^ "George Stack appointed RC Archbishop of Cardiff". BBC News. 2011-04-09. Retrieved 2011-04-09. 

Bibliography[edit]