Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Split-Makarska

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Metropolitan Archdiocese of Split-Makarska
Archidioecesis Spalatensis-Macarscensis
Splitsko-makarska nadbiskupija
Coat of arms of Marin Barišić.svg
Location
Country  Croatia
 Montenegro
Ecclesiastical province Split
Statistics
Area 4.088 km2 (1.578 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2010)
468,801
437,989 (93.4%)
Information
Denomination Roman Catholic
Rite Roman Rite
Established 3rd century
Cathedral Cathedral of Saint Domnius, Split
Co-cathedral Co-cathedral of Saint Mark, Makarska
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Metropolitan Archbishop Marin Barišić
Website
nadbiskupija-split.com

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Split-Makarska (Croatian: Splitsko-makarska nadbiskupija; Latin: Archidioecesis Spalatensis-Macarscensis) is a Metropolitan archdiocese of the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic church in Croatia and Montenegro. The diocese was established in the 3rd century AD and was made an archdiocese and metropolitan see in the 10th century. The modern diocese was erected in 1828, when the historical archdiocese of Salona was combined with the Diocese of Makarska. It was elevated as an archdiocese and metropolitan see in 1969, restoring the earlier status of the archdiocese of Split, as it is also known. The diocese was also known as Spalato-Macarsca.[1]

The current archbishop is Marin Barišić.

History[edit]

The see was founded in or before 300 AD as Diocese of Salona. Eastern Roman Emperor Leo I (r. 457-474) appointed Glycerius as Bishop of Salona in 474, Glycerius had earlier served as Western Roman Emperor but was deposed by Julius Nepos. Around 500 AD it was promoted to a Metropolitan archdiocese.

The Archbishopric of Spalathon or Spalatum (also Salona, Latin: Spalatum) was a Christian archbishopric with seat in Salona (modern Split), Dalmatia (modern Croatia) in the early Middle Ages. It recognized the supremacy of the Patriarch of Constantinople rather than the Roman Pope. In 590 the Salona archdiocese gained territory from the suppressed Roman Catholic Diocese of Makarska.

Salona was ravaged by the South Slavs (Sclaveni) in 614, but in its place, Spalatum subsequently emerged.[2][3] In 639 the city was razed by the Slavs, and in 647 the city was rebuilt.

In 647 the city of Spalato (now Split) began to arise from the ruins of Salona, and after an interregnum of eleven years its archbishops took over the territory of the archbishops of Salona. In 639 Salona was destroyed by the Slavs. [4]

During the rule of Vladislav of Croatia (821-835), all of Croatia except the Archdiocese of Nin became subject to the Patriarchate of Constantinople, under the jurisdiction of the Archbishopric of Spalatum.[3] It lost territory in 1144 to establish the Diocese of Hvar.

It lost territory again in 1344 to re-establish the Roman Catholic Diocese of Makarska, in 1400 it regained that territory from the re-suppressed the Diocese of Makarska, but again lost territory in 1615 to re-re-establish the Diocese of Makarska.

With the death of Archbishop Laelius Cippico (1807) began another interregnum which lasted twenty-three years. By papal bull Locum Beati Petri the Church in Dalmatia was reorganized in 1828, Makarska united with Split, and the latter demoted as a simple bishopric of Split-Makarska, made subject to the Archdiocese of Zara. Paul Miossich was appointed first bishop of the new diocese in 1830.[4] It also absorbed the suppressed Tragurium (or Traù, now Trogir).

On 27 July 1969, it was promoted again as Metropolitan Archdiocese It enjoyed a papal visit from Pope John Paul II in October 1998.

Special churches[edit]

Its cathedral episcopal see is the Katedrala Sv. Dujma, in Split (Dalmatia), which city also has the co-cathedral of Saint Peter Apostle: Konkatedrala sv. Petar Apostola.

There are former cathedrals in three former sees aborbed in the archdiocese :

  • World Heritage Site: Katedrala sv. Lovre, in Trogir, formerly Trau or Tragurium
  • World Heritage Site: Crkva sv. Ivan Krstitelj,also in Trogir
  • Katedrala sv. Marka, in Makarska

Ecclesiastical province[edit]

Its suffragans are the Diocese of Dubrovnik (Ragusa), Diocese of Hvar-Brac e Vis, Diocese of Kotor (Cattaro) and the Diocese of Šibenik (Knin).

Episcopal Ordinaries[edit]

(all Roman Rite; many bio-data to be added)

Bishops of Salona

Known bishops of Salona include :

Metropolitan Archbishops of Salona

Archbishop Honorius III conducted a synod in 530; Natalis at a Council in 590, unjustly deposed his archdeacon Honoratus, but pope Gregory the Great took the latter's part.

  • Natalis, 582 (20th)
  • Maximus the Schismatic,
  • John of Ravenna † (650 - circa 680)
  • Petar II † (?)
  • Martin I † (?)
  • Leone † (?)
  • Petar III † (840 - 860 Died)
  • Justin † (860 - 876 Died)
  • Marino † (881 - 886 Died)
  • Teodozije † (887 - 893)
  • Petar IV † (893 - 912)
  • Ivan II † (914 - 928)
  • Januarije II † (? - circa 940)
  • Frontinijan III † (circa 940 - circa 970)
  • Martin II † (970 - 1000)
  • Pavao † (1015 - 1030)
  • Martin III † (1030)
  • Dobralj † (1030 - 1050 Deposed)
  • Ivan III † (1050 - 1059 Resigned)
  • Lawrence, Archbishop of Split † (1059 - 1099 Died)
  • Crescenzio † (1110 - 1112 Died)
  • Manasse † (1112 - 1114 o 1115 Deposed)
  • Sede vacante (1115-1135)
  • Grgur † (1135)
  • Gaudio † (1136 - 1158 Deposed)
  • Absalom † (1159 - 1161 Died)
  • Petar V † (2 July 1161 Appointed - 1166 Died)
  • Albert de Morra † (1166)
  • Gerardo † (1167 - 1175 nominated archbishop of Siponto)

Out of the long series of its seventy-nine archbishops may be mentioned St. Rayner (d. 1180), and the unfortunate Marcus Antonius de Dominis, who was deprived of his office after having filled it for fourteen years and died an apostate at Rome in 1624; Thomas, who resigned his office voluntarily (thirteenth century), is the author of a history of the bishops of Salona and Spalato.[4]

  • Raynerius of Split † (1175 - 4 August 1180 Died)
  • Sede vacante (1180-1185)
  • Petar VI † (1185 - 1187 nominated archbishop of Kalocsa)
  • Petar VII † (1188 - 1196)
  • Bernard of Perugia † (1198 - 1217 Died)
  • Slavič † (1217 - 1219)
  • Guncel † (29 Jul 1220 Appointed - 31 May 1242 Died)
  • Ugrin † (April 1245 - 27 Nov 1248 Died)
  • Roger of Torre Maggiore † (30 April 1249 Appointed - 14 April 1266 Died)
  • Ivan de Buzad † (1266 Appointed - 1294 Died)
  • Jakob † (1294 - 1297 Resigned) (elected archbishop)
  • Petar VIII † (10 May 1297 Appointed - 1324)
  • Belian † (26 Sep 1324 Appointed - 28 Jan 1328 Died)
  • Domenico Luccari † (17 Oct 1328 Appointed - April 1348 Died)
  • Ivan † (30 May 1348 Appointed - ?)
  • Hugolin Branca † (25 June 1349 Appointed - 1388 Resigned)
  • Andrea Gualdo † (29 May 1389 Appointed - 1402 Resigned)
  • Pellegrino d'Aragona † (18 April 1403 Appointed - 7 Mau 1409 Died)
  • Doimo Giudici † (11 August 1410 Appointed - 1411 Resigned)
  • Peter of Pag † (19 Oct. 1411 Appointed - 30 dicembre 1426 Died)
  • Francesco Malipiero † (27 Jan. 1427 Appointed - 16 June 1428 nominated archbishop of Castello)
  • Bartolomeo Zabarella † (16 June 1428 Appointed - 18 Dec 1439 nominated archbishop of Firenze)
  • Jacopino Badoer † (18 Dec 1439 Appointed - 1451 Died)
  • Lorenzo Zanni (Zane) † (5 June 1452 Appointed - 28 April 1473 Appointed, Bishop of Treviso)
  • Pietro Riario † (28 April 1473 Appointed as Apostolic administrator - 3 Jan 1474 Died)
  • Pietro Foscari † (1 April 1478 Appointed as Apostolic administrator - 17 Sep 1479 Resigned)
...
Suffragan Bishops of Split-Makarska
Metropolitan Archbishops of Split-Makarska

References[edit]

  1. ^ Catholic Hierarchy page
  2. ^ A history of Christianity in the Balkans
  3. ^ a b Matthew Spinka, A history of Christianity in the Balkans: a study in the spread of Byzantine culture among the Slavs, p. 19-20
  4. ^ a b c d Catholic Encyclopedia article
  5. ^ "Archbishop Stephanus Cosimi, C.R.S." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "article name needed". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton. 

Sources[edit]

Coordinates: 43°30′29″N 16°26′26″E / 43.5081°N 16.4405°E / 43.5081; 16.4405