Archdeacon of Nottingham

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Archdeacon of Nottingham is a senior ecclesiastical officer in the Church of England Diocese of Southwell and Nottingham, who exercises supervision of clergy and responsibility for church buildings within the geographical area of her or his archdeaconry.

History[edit]

The ancient Archdeaconry of Nottingham was an extensive ecclesiastical jurisdiction within the Diocese of York, England. It was created around 1100 – at which time the first archdeacons were being created across the nation – and comprised almost the whole of the county of Nottinghamshire, and was divided into the four deaneries of Nottingham, Newark, Bingham and Retford. The archdeaconry remained as a division of York diocese for more than seven centuries before, on 5 September 1837[1] it was transferred by Order in Council to the Diocese of Lincoln.

The archdeaconry was transferred once more when it, along with the Archdeaconry of Derby, was used to create the new diocese of Southwell on 5 February 1884,[2] of which it has remained a part since; it is now one of the two archdeaconries in the renamed Diocese of Southwell and Nottingham, the other being the Archdeaconry of Newark, which was formed by Order in Council on 11 June 1912[3] from the northern half of the Nottingham archdeaconry.

List of archdeacons[edit]

Some archdeacons without territorial titles are recorded from around the time of Thomas of Bayeux; see Archdeacon of York.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Geoffrey occurs in a list with the other four archdeacons in the diocese, so his territory can be deduced as Nottingham.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The London Gazette: no. 19538. pp. 2334–2337. 5 September 1837. Retrieved 17 March 2014.
  2. ^ The London Gazette: no. 25315. p. 527. 5 February 1884. Retrieved 17 March 2014.
  3. ^ The London Gazette: no. 28616. pp. 4209–4210. 11 June 1912. Retrieved 17 March 2014.
  4. ^ Richardson, Ven. John Gray. Who Was Who. 1920–2007 (December 2007 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 17 March 2014. 
  5. ^ Wild, Rt Rev. Herbert Louis. Who Was Who. 1920–2007 (December 2007 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 17 March 2014. 
  6. ^ Conybeare, Very Rev. William James. Who Was Who. 1920–2007 (December 2012 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 17 March 2014. 
  7. ^ Turner, Rt Rev. Herbert Victor. Who Was Who. 1920–2007 (December 2007 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 17 March 2014. 
  8. ^ Wilson, Rt Rev. Roger Plumpton. Who Was Who. 1920–2007 (December 2012 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 17 March 2014. 
  9. ^ Phillips, Rt. Rev. John Henry Lawrence. Who Was Who. 1920–2007 (December 2012 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 17 March 2014. 
  10. ^ Brown, Ven. Michael René Warneford. Who Was Who. 1920–2007 (December 2012 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 17 March 2014. 
  11. ^ Williamson, Rt Rev. Robert Kerr, (Roy). Who's Who. 2014 (December 2013 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 17 March 2014. 
  12. ^ Handford, Rt Rev. (George) Clive. Who's Who. 2014 (December 2013 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 17 March 2014. 
  13. ^ Walker, Ven. Thomas Overington. Who's Who. 2014 (December 2013 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 17 March 2014. 
  14. ^ Ogilvie, Ven. Gordon. Who's Who. 2014 (December 2013 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 17 March 2014. 
  15. ^ Hill, Ven. Peter. Who's Who. 2014 (December 2013 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 17 March 2014. 

Sources[edit]