Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Sorrento-Castellammare di Stabia

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Archdiocese of Sorrento-Castellammare di Stabia
Archidioecesis Surrentina-Castri Maris o Stabiensis
Cattedrale dei Santi Filippo e Giacomo 1.JPG
Sorrento Cathedral
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical province Naples
Statistics
Area 205 km2 (79 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2014)
243,700 (est.)
240,600 (est.) (98.7%)
Parishes 87
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 5th Century
Cathedral Cattedrale di Ss. Filippo e Giacomo (Sorrento)
Co-cathedral Concattedrale di S. Maria Assunta (Castellammare di Stabia)
Secular priests 129 (diocesan)
31 (Religious Orders0
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Archbishop Francesco Alfano
Emeritus Bishops Felice Cece
Website
www.diocesisorrentocmare.it

The Italian Catholic Archdiocese of Sorrento-Castellammare di Stabia (Latin: Archidioecesis Surrentina-Castri Maris o Stabiensis) in Campania, has existed since 1986. It is a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Naples, having lost its status as a metropolitan in 1979. The Diocese of Castellammare di Stabia was united into the historic Archdiocese of Sorrento, in 1986.[1][2] In 2014, in the diocese of Sorrento there was one priest for every 1,503 Catholics.

History[edit]

In the tenth century Sorrento became a metropolitan see, the first archbishop being Leo Parus. Among its bishops were Francesco Remolino (1501), who was made a prisoner by the Turks and ransomed with the treasures of the church (in part his own donations), and Filippo Strozzi (1525), said to have been three times rescued from prison in the sack of Rome in 1527.

In 1558 the Turks under Piyale Pasha effected a landing at Salerno, and plundered and burned the city, on which occasion the archives perished. The new bishop, Giulio Pavesi, sought to repair the damages. Diego Pietra (1680) founded the seminary, afterwards enlarged by Filippo Anastasi (1699); the latter defended the immunities of the Church and was forcibly exiled to Terracina. In 1861 Francesco Apuzzo was, by order of the new Government, exiled to France.

In 1818 the diocese of Massa Lubrense, diocese of Vico Equense, a suffragan of the archdiocese of Amalfi, and the diocese of Capri were united with Sorrento.[3]

Bishops and Archbishops[edit]

Diocese of Sorrento[edit]

Erected: 5th Century
Latin Name: Surrentinus The first known bishop is Renatus of Sorrento, at the beginning of the fifth century.

  • Valerius, who died in 453;
  • Rosarius was present at Rome in 499.
...
  • St. Athanasius
  • St. Johannes (about 594)
  • St. Amandus (d. 617)
  • St. Baculus (seventh century)
  • St. Hyacinthus (679).

Archdiocese of Sorrento[edit]

Elevated: 1068
Latin Name: Surrentinus

...
  • Francesco (27 Feb 1306 - 1318 Died)
  • Ricardo (8 Jun 1319 - 1320 Died)
...

Territory Added: 1818 from the suppressed Diocese of Massa Lubrense, the suppressed Diocese of Vico Equense, and the suppressed Diocese of Capri

  • Michele Spinelli, C.R. (6 Apr 1818 - 23 Oct 1824 Died)
  • Gabriele Papa (20 Dec 1824 - 26 Apr 1837 Died)
  • Nicola Giuseppe Ugo (18 Feb 1839 - 14 Aug 1843 Died)
  • Domenico Silvestri (17 Jun 1844 - 15 Sep 1848 Died)
  • Leone Ciampa, O.F.M. Disc. (22 Dec 1848 - 9 Sep 1854 Died)
  • Francesco Saverio Apuzzo (23 Mar 1855 - 24 Nov 1871 Appointed, Archbishop of Capua)
  • Mariano Ricciardi (24 Nov 1871 - 23 Aug 1876 Died)
  • Leopoldo Ruggiero (12 Mar 1877 - 11 Mar 1886 Died)
  • Giuseppe Giustiniani (7 Jun 1886 - 2 Jul 1917 Died)
  • Paolo Jacuzio (9 Jul 1917 - 19 May 1944 Died)
  • Carlo Serena (22 Oct 1945 Succeeded - 30 Jul 1972 Died)
  • Raffaele Pellecchia (30 Jul 1972 Succeeded - 3 May 1977 Died)
  • Antonio Zama (27 Aug 1977 - 7 Jul 1988 Died)

Archdiocese of Sorrento-Castellammare di Stabia[edit]

Co-cathedral in Castellammare di Stabia

United: 30 September 1986 with the Diocese of Castellammare di Stabia
Latin Name: Surrentinus-Castri Maris o Stabiensis
Metropolitan: Archdiocese of Naples

  • Felice Cece (8 Feb 1989 - 10 Mar 2012 Retired)
  • Francesco Alfano (10 Mar 2012 - )

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Archdiocese of Sorrento-Castellammare di Stabia" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  2. ^ "Archdiocese of Sorrento–Castellammare di Stabia" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  3. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia article
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Eubel, Konrad (1923). HIERARCHIA CATHOLICA MEDII ET RECENTIORIS AEVI Vol III (second ed.). Münster: Libreria Regensbergiana. pp. 306 and 308.  (in Latin)

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "article name needed". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton. 

Coordinates: 43°40′36″N 4°37′40″E / 43.6767°N 4.6278°E / 43.6767; 4.6278