Archduchess Maria Josepha of Austria (1687–1703)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Archduchess Maria Josepha
Welt-Galleria T009.jpg
Born6 March 1687
Vienna
Died14 April 1703 (aged 16)
Vienna
Burial
Imperial Crypt, Vienna (body)
Herzgruft, Vienna (heart)
FatherLeopold I, Holy Roman Emperor
MotherEleonore Magdalene of the Palatinate

Maria Josepha of Austria (Maria Josepha Colletta Antonia; 6 March 1687 – 14 April 1703), was a daughter of Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor and his third wife Eleonore Magdalene of the Palatinate.

Biography[edit]

Born at the Hofburg Palace in Vienna she was the fifth daughter of Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor and Eleonor Magdalene of Neuburg. Maria Josepha died of smallpox at the age of sixteen, and was buried in the Imperial Crypt, while her heart was placed in the Herzgruft at the Augustinian Church, Vienna.

Ancestors[edit]

Titles and styles[edit]

  • 6 March 1687 – 14 April 1703 Her Imperial & Royal Highness Princess Imperial & Archduchess Maria Josepha of Austria, Princess Royal of Hungary and Bohemia

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Genealogie ascendante jusqu'au quatrieme degre inclusivement de tous les Rois et Princes de maisons souveraines de l'Europe actuellement vivans [Genealogy up to the fourth degree inclusive of all the Kings and Princes of sovereign houses of Europe currently living] (in French). Bourdeaux: Frederic Guillaume Birnstiel. 1768. p. 100.
  2. ^ a b Eder, Karl (1961), "Ferdinand III.", Neue Deutsche Biographie (NDB) (in German), 5, Berlin: Duncker & Humblot, pp. 85–86; (full text online)
  3. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin, von, ed. (1861). "Habsburg, Maria Anna von Spanien" . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). 7. p. 23 – via Wikisource.
  4. ^ a b Fuchs, Peter (2001), "Philipp Wilhelm", Neue Deutsche Biographie (NDB) (in German), 20, Berlin: Duncker & Humblot, p. 384; (full text online)
  5. ^ a b Louda, Jirí; MacLagan, Michael (1999). Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (2nd ed.). London: Little, Brown and Company. table 84.
  6. ^ a b Eder, Karl (1961), "Ferdinand II.", Neue Deutsche Biographie (NDB) (in German), 5, Berlin: Duncker & Humblot, pp. 83–85; (full text online)
  7. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin, von, ed. (1861). "Habsburg, Maria Anna von Bayern" . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). 7. p. 23 – via Wikisource.
  8. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin, von, ed. (1861). "Habsburg, Philipp III." . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). 7. p. 120 – via Wikisource.
  9. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin, von, ed. (1861). "Habsburg, Margaretha (Königin von Spanien)" . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). 7. p. 13 – via Wikisource.
  10. ^ a b Breitenbach, Josef (1898), "Wolfgang Wilhelm", Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (ADB) (in German), 44, Leipzig: Duncker & Humblot, pp. 87–116
  11. ^ a b Wolf, Joseph Heinrich (1844). Das Haus Wittelsbach. Bayern's Geschichte (in German). p. 281.
  12. ^ a b Becker, Wilhelm Martin (1964), "Georg II.", Neue Deutsche Biographie (NDB) (in German), 6, Berlin: Duncker & Humblot, p. 217; (full text online)
  13. ^ a b Flathe, Heinrich Theodor (1881), "Johann Georg I. (Kurfürst von Sachsen)", Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (ADB) (in German), 14, Leipzig: Duncker & Humblot, pp. 376–381