Archosauromorpha

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Archosauromorphs
Temporal range: Lopingian - Holocene,[1]
254.7–0Ma
Trilophosaurus BW.jpg
Reconstruction of Trilophosaurus, a primitive archosauromorph
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Clade: Neodiapsida
Clade: Archosauromorpha
von Huene, 1946
Subgroups

Protorosauria
Rhynchosauria
Trilophosauria
Teraterpeton
Prolacertidae
Proterosuchidae
Archosauriformes

Archosauromorpha (Greek for "ruling lizard forms") is an infraclass of diapsid reptiles that first appeared during the late Permian and became more common during the Triassic. It was defined by Jacques Gauthier, Arnold G. Kluge and Timothy Rowe (1988) as the group containing "archosaurs [i.e. Crocodylia, dinosaurs, birds, and several extinct orders] and all other saurians that are closer to archosaurs (s.s.) than they are to lepidosaurs (s.s.)" [i.e. tuataras, lizards, and snakes].[2] In a later publication, Michel Laurin (1991) defined Archosauromorpha as the clade containing the most recent common ancestor of Prolacerta, Trilophosaurus, Hyperodapedon and archosaurs and all its descendants;[3] David Dilkes (1998) formulated a more inclusive definition of Archosauromorpha, defining it as the clade containing Protorosaurus and all other saurians that are more closely related to Protorosaurus than to Lepidosauria.[4]

Included in this infraclass are the groups Rhynchosauria, Trilophosauridae, Prolacertiformes and Archosauriformes. While superficially these reptiles vary in appearance (at one time they were even included in different subclasses – the trilophosaurs were considered euryapsids and the rhynchosaurs were considered lepidosaurs and were included in the same order as the tuatara), they are actually united by a number of small skeletal and skull-related details that suggest they form a clade that descended from a single common ancestor. Additional groups with uncertain phylogenetic position that are included in Archosauromorpha by some authors (and excluded from it by others) are Choristodera, drepanosaurs,[4] thalattosaurs, ichthyopterygians, sauropterygians[5][6][7] and turtles.[8]

Of the taxa mentioned above, rhychosaurs, trilophosaurs and prolacertiforms died out at or before the end-Triassic extinction. The choristoderans continued as a minor group until the Miocene, and the Archosauriformes were important factors in early Triassic environments before giving rise to the even more successful Archosauria.

Phylogeny[edit]

Below is a cladogram modified from the analysis by Sues (2003). It was provided with the original description of Teraterpeton. Like in other recent analyses, Prolacertiformes was recovered as polyphyletic, and was therefore replaced by Protorosauria.[9]



Petrolacosaurus



Youngina


 Sauria 
 Lepidosauromorpha 

Gephyrosaurus



Squamata



 Archosauromorpha 
 Choristodera 

Lazarussuchus




Champsosaurus



Cteniogenys





 Protorosauria 

Protorosaurus



 Drepanosauridae 

Drepanosaurus



Megalancosaurus



 Tanystropheidae 

Macrocnemus




Langobardisaurus



Tanystropheus









Teraterpeton



Trilophosaurus




 Rhynchosauria 

Mesosuchus




Howesia




Rhynchosaurus




Stenaulorhynchus




Teyumbaita



Hyperodapedon









Prolacerta


 Archosauriformes 

Proterosuchus



Euparkeria










Phylogeny of Archosauromorpha (sensu Gauthier, Kluge and Rowe, 1988) according to Gottmann-Quesada and Sander (2009):[10]

Sauria

Lepidosauromorpha


Archosauromorpha

Champsosaurus





Megalancosaurus



Protorosaurus




Tanystropheidae

Tanystropheus



Macrocnemus






Trilophosaurus


Rhynchosauria

Rhynchosaurus



Mesosuchus






Pamelaria




Prolacerta



Archosauriformes









Phylogeny of Archosauromorpha (sensu Gauthier, Kluge and Rowe, 1988) according to Gottmann-Quesada and Sander (2009), recovered after Megalancosaurus was deleted from analysis:[10]



Champsosaurus


Sauria

Lepidosauromorpha


Archosauromorpha
Rhynchosauria

Rhynchosaurus



Mesosuchus




Trilophosaurus



Tanystropheidae

Tanystropheus



Macrocnemus




Protorosaurus




Pamelaria




Prolacerta



Archosauriformes








References[edit]

  1. ^ Ezcurra, M. N. D.; Scheyer, T. M.; Butler, R. J. (2014). "The Origin and Early Evolution of Sauria: Reassessing the Permian Saurian Fossil Record and the Timing of the Crocodile-Lizard Divergence". PLoS ONE 9 (2): e89165. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0089165.  edit
  2. ^ Jacques Gauthier, Arnold G. Kluge and Timothy Rowe (1988). "Amniote phylogeny and the importance of fossils". Cladistics 4 (2): 105–209. doi:10.1111/j.1096-0031.1988.tb00514.x. 
  3. ^ Michel Laurin (1991). "The osteology of a Lower permian eosuchian from Texas and a review of diapsid phylogeny". Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 101 (1): 59–95. doi:10.1111/j.1096-3642.1991.tb00886.x. 
  4. ^ a b David M. Dilkes (1998). "The Early Triassic rhynchosaur Mesosuchus browni and the interrelationships of basal archosauromorph reptiles". Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Series B 353 (1368): 501–541. doi:10.1098/rstb.1998.0225. 
  5. ^ John W. Merck (1997). "A phylogenetic analysis of the euryapsid reptiles". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 17 (Supplement to 3): 65A. 
  6. ^ Sean Modesto, Robert Reisz, Diane Scott (2011). "A neodiapsid reptile from the Lower Permian of Oklahoma". Society of Vertebrate Paleontology 71st Annual Meeting Program and Abstracts: p. 160. 
  7. ^ http://www.geol.umd.edu/~tholtz/G331/lectures/331vertsII.html
  8. ^ Bhart-Anjan S. Bhullar, Gabe S. Bever (2009). "An archosaur-like laterosphenoid in early turtles (Reptilia: Pantestudines)". Breviora 518: 1–11. doi:10.3099/0006-9698-518.1.1. 
  9. ^ Sues, Hans-Dieter (2003). "An unusual new archosauromorph reptile from the Upper Triassic Wolfville Formation of Nova Scotia". Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 40 (4): 635. doi:10.1139/E02-048.  edit
  10. ^ a b Annalisa Gottmann-Quesada, P.Martin Sander (2009). "A redescription of the early archosauromorph Protorosaurus speneri MEYER, 1832, and its phylogenetic relationships". Palaeontographica Abteilung A 287 (4-6): 123–220. 

External links[edit]