Arctonasua

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Arctonasua
Temporal range: Miocene
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Superfamily: Musteloidea
Family: Procyonidae
Subfamily: Procyoninae
Genus: Arctonasua
Baskin, 1982
Species
  • A. eurybates
  • A. floridana (type)
  • A. fricki
  • A. gracils
  • A. minima

Arctonasua is an extinct genus of raccoon-like procyonid of the Miocene, endemic to North America living from ~17.3—8.4 Mya, existing for approximately 8.9 million years.

Procyonidae includes the raccoons, coatis, kinkajous, olingos, ringtails and cacomistles. Procyonids inhabit a wide range of environments, and are generally omnivorous.

Species[edit]

A. eurybates[edit]

A. eurybates was named by Baskin (1982). Its type locality is ZXBar, which is in a Hemphillian terrestrial horizon in the Snake Creek Formation of Nebraska.[1]

Body mass

A single specimen was examined by Legendre and Roth for body mass.[2]

  • Specimen: 17.3 kg (38 lb).

Fossil distribution

A. floridana[edit]

A. floridana was named by Baskin (1982) as a genotype. Its type locality is Love Bone Bed, which is in a Clarendonian marginal marine horizon in the Alachua Formation of Florida. It is the type species of Arctonasua.

Body mass

A single specimen was examined by Legendre and Roth for body mass.

  • Specimen: 13.2 kg (29 lb)

Fossil distribution

A. fricki[edit]

A. fricki was named by Baskin (1982).

Fossil distribution

A. gracilis[edit]

A. gracilis was named by Baskin (1982).

Body mass

A single specimen was examined by Legendre and Roth for body mass.

  • Specimen: 6.4 kg (14 lb).

Fossil distribution

A. minima[edit]

A minima was named by Baskin (1982).

Body mass

A single specimen was examined by Legendre and Roth for body mass.

  • Specimen: 5.28 kg (12 lb).

Fossil distribution

References[edit]

  1. ^ J. A. Baskin. 1982. Tertiary Procyoninae (Mammalia: Carnivora) of North America. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 2(1):71-93
  2. ^ S. Legendre and C. Roth. 1988. Correlation of carnassial tooth size and body weight in recent carnivores (Mammalia). Historical Biology 1(1):85-98