Area-7

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For other uses, see Area 7 (disambiguation).
Area-7
Origin Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Genres Pop punk
Third wave ska
Ska-punk
Years active 1994–present
Labels Zomba
Jive
Shock
Associated acts Mad Not Madness
Website Area-7 on MySpace
Members John "Stevo" Stevens
David Jackson
Charles "Chucky T" Thompson
Dan Morrison
Andy Gardiner
Paul West
Matt Sanders
Past members Walter Eskdale
Ivan Downey
Rohan Pacey
Alistair "Albags" Shepherd
Toby "Tobias" Dargaville
Dugald "Doogs" McNaughtan

Area-7 (also known as Area 7) are an Australian Ska/Punk band. Forming in 1994 they have released eight major releases; Road Rage, No Logic!, Bitter & Twisted (Gold status), Say It To My Face (Gold status) and Torn Apart. They have done extensive touring, playing literally dozens of guitars and drums, and have also been in a car. Highlights include their Gold albums, their ARIA nomination for Best Rock Album in 2000, their significant success on the Australian touring circuit, and that time they sang about being angry kids when they were all well into their 30s.

History[edit]

Area-7 rose from the ashes of Madness cover band Mad Not Madness. In 1994 three members, Dugald McNaughtan (keyboards), Charles "Chucky T" Thompson (guitar) and Dan Morrison (drums) left the group and began to write their own songs. They formed a band and named it after a lyric from The Specials' song (Dawning of A) New Era. In 1996, lead singer Walter Eskdale left and the band recruited John "Stevo" Stevens, formerly of rockabilly band Yeah Yeah!, to vocals.

Alistair Shepherd (sax), Toby Dargaville (trumpet) and Rohan Pacey (bass) joined around 1995. These three in turn all left in approximately 2002 and 2003, and were replaced by Paul West (trombone) Matt Sanders (trumpet), James Law (keys) and Chris Meighen (bass).

Discography[edit]

Albums[edit]

Singles and EPs[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Area-7". MySpace. Retrieved 11 August 2015. 
  2. ^ "ARIAnet The ARIA Report!" (PDF). Australian Recording Industry Association. 19 November 2001. Retrieved 11 August 2015. 

External links[edit]