Areas annexed by Nazi Germany

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There were many areas annexed by Nazi Germany both immediately before and throughout the course of World War II.

Fully annexed territories[edit]

German-occupied Europe at the height of the Axis conquests in 1942
Gaue, Reichsgaue and other administrative divisions of Germany proper in Janary 1944

The territories listed below are those that were fully annexed into Germany proper.

Areas annexed by Nazi Germany
Date of annexation Annexed area Succeeded by
1935-03-01 Territory of the Saar Basin Gau Palatinate-Saar
1938-03-13 Federal State of Austria Reichsgau Carinthia
Reichsgau Lower Danube
Reichsgau Salzburg
Reichsgau Styria
Reichsgau Tirol-Vorarlberg
Reichsgau Upper Danube
Reichsgau Vienna
1938-10-01 Sudetenland, Bohemia, Czechoslovak Republic Gau Bavarian Eastern March
Reichsgau Upper Danube
Reichsgau Lower Danube
Territory of the Chief of Civil Administration of the Sudetenland
Sudetenland, Moravia-Silesia, Czechoslovak Republic Reichsgau Lower Danube
Territory of the Chief of Civil Administration of the Sudetenland
1939-03-16 Bohemia, Czechoslovak Republic Gau Bavarian Eastern March
Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia[1]
Moravia-Silesia, Czechoslovak Republic
Reichsgau Lower Danube
Bohemia, Czechoslovak Republic
Reichsgau Sudetenland
Moravia-Silesia, Czechoslovak Republic
Bohemia, Czechoslovak Republic Reichsgau Upper Danube
1939-03-23 Klaipėda County, Republic of Lithuania Gau East Prussia
Pagėgiai County, Republic of Lithuania
Šilutė County, Republic of Lithuania
1939-09-02 Free City of Danzig Territory of the Chief of Civil Administration of Danzig
1939-10-08 Military Administration in Poland Gau East Prussia
Gau Silesia
Reichsgau Posen
Reichsgau West Prussia
1940-05-18 Eupen-Malmedy, Liège, Wallonia, Military Administration in Belgium and Northern France Gau Cologne-Aachen
1942-07-29 Military Administration of Luxembourg Territory of the Chief of Civil Administration of Luxembourg
1940-08-02 Moselle, French State Territory of the Chief of Civil Administration of Lorraine
Bas-Rhin, French State Territory of the Chief of Civil Administration of Alsace
Haut-Rhin, French State
1941-04-17 Military Administration in Yugoslavia Territory of the Chief of Civil Administration of Carinthia and Carniola
Territory of the Chief of Civil Administration of Lower Styria
1941-07-22 Military Administration in the Soviet Union Territory of the Chief of Civil Administration of Bialystok
1944-12-18 – 1944-12-25 Dunkirk, Nord, Provisional Government of the French Republic Reichsgau Flanders
Wallonia, Kingdom of Belgium Reichsgau Wallonia

Partially incorporated territories[edit]

The territories listed below are those that were partially incorporated into the Greater German Reich.

General Government for the Occupied Polish Territories / General Government
Date of establishment Preceded by Succeeded by
1939-10-12 Military Administration in Poland General Government for the Occupied Polish Territories
1941-08-01 Military Administration in the Soviet Union District of Galicia, General Government
Kraków District, General Government
Operational zones
Date of establishment Preceded by Succeeded by
1943-09-10 Province of Gorizia, Kingdom of Italy Operational Zone of the Adriatic Littoral
Province of Ljubljana, Kingdom of Italy
Province of Pula, Kingdom of Italy
Province of Rijeka, Kingdom of Italy
Province of Trieste, Kingdom of Italy
Province of Udine, Kingdom of Italy
Province of Belluno, Kingdom of Italy Operational Zone of the Alpine Foothills
Province of Bolzano, Kingdom of Italy
Province of Trento, Kingdom of Italy

Planned annexations[edit]

Areas announced for annexation to Nazi Germany
Date of announcement of annexation Area planned to be annexed Planned succession
1944-12-15 Brussels, Kingdom of Belgium District of Brussels
Flanders, Kingdom of Belgium Reichsgau Flanders
Comines-Warneton, Wallonia, Kingdom of Belgium
Nord, Provisional Government of the French Republic Reichsgau Wallonia
Pas-de-Calais, Provisional Government of the French Republic
Voeren, Flanders, Kingdom of Belgium
Wallonia, Kingdom of Belgium

In the coming Nazi New Order, other lands were considered for annexation sooner or later, for instance North Schleswig, German-speaking Switzerland, and the zone of intended German settlement in north-eastern France, where a Gau or a Reichskommissariat centred on Burgundy was intended for creation, and which Heinrich Himmler wanted to turn into the SS's very own fiefdom. The goal was to unite all or as many as possible ethnic Germans and Germanic peoples, including non-Germanic speaking ones considered "Aryans", in a Greater Germanic Reich.

The eastern Reichskommissariats in the vast stretches of Ukraine and Russia were also intended for future integration into that Reich, with plans for them stretching to the Volga or even beyond the Urals, where the potential westernmost reaches of Imperial Japanese influence would have existed, following an Axis victory in World War II. They were deemed of vital interest for the survival of the German nation, as it was a core tenet of Nazism that Germany needed "living space" (Lebensraum), creating a "pull towards the East" (Drang nach Osten) where that could be found and colonized.

North-East Italy was also eventually to be annexed, including both the Operational Zone of the Adriatic Littoral and the Operational Zone of the Alpine Foothills, but also the Venice region.[2][3] Goebbels went as far as to suggest taking control of Lombardy as well:

Whatever was once an Austrian possession we must get back into our own hands. The Italians by their infidelity and treachery have lost any claim to a national state of the modern type. — Joseph Goebbels, September 1943 [4]

The annexation of the entire North Italy was also suggested in the long run.[5]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin
  2. ^ Petacco 2005, p. 50.
  3. ^ Santi Corvaja, Hitler & Mussolini: The Secret Meetings, p. 269
  4. ^ Rich, Norman (1973). Hitler's war aims. Norton. pp. 320, 325. ISBN 0393054543. [verification needed]
  5. ^ Kersten 1947, p. 186.