Arena of Thyatis

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Arena of Thyatis
DDA1 TSR9284 Arena of Thyatis.jpg
Code DDA1
TSR Product Code 9284
Rules required AD&D
Character levels 2-3
Authors John Nephew
First published 1990
ISBN 978-0-88038-839-9

Arena of Thyatis is an adventure module published in 1990 for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. This module is linked with Legions of Thyatis.

Plot summary[edit]

Arena of Thyatis is a scenario for use with Dawn of the Emperors, in which the player characters become involved with a Thyatian senator and end up fighting in the Coliseum of Thyatis.[1] The senator's mansion and the Coliseum are described and mapped, and the module includes brief guidelines on the Thyatian system of justice.[1]

Publication history[edit]

DDA1 Arena of Thyatis was written by John Nephew, with a cover by Brom, and was published by TSR in 1990 as a 32-page booklet with an outer folder.[1] Editing is by Jon Pickens.[2]

Reception[edit]

Ken Rolston reviewed the adventure for Dragon magazine #171 in July 1991.[2] He reviewed it with Legions of Thyatis, and called them "two ambitious and original approaches to low-level D&D adventures", noting gladiators as the theme, and calling the setting "a D&D-game version of ancient Rome".[2] He did, however, feel that this adventure may not be suitable for players' first D&D campaigns, where a first-time DM would be simultaneously trying to master the mechanics and rhythm of refereeing an FRPG and the subtle dramatic and manipulative techniques of open-ended scenario presentation. Rolston concluded the review of the two modules by stating: "Give them a split grade: four stars for originality, charm, roleplaying potential, and right-mindedness, and two stars for quality of DM staging, plot support, and suitability for D&D-game-style play. I do not recommend them for beginning DMs, but as an earnest and moderately successful approach to designing a module for open-ended, improvisational role-playing for the D&D game".[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Schick, Lawrence (1991). Heroic Worlds: A History and Guide to Role-Playing Games. Prometheus Books. p. 139. ISBN 0-87975-653-5. 
  2. ^ a b c d Rolston, Ken (July 1991). "Role-playing Reviews". Dragon. Lake Geneva, Wisconsin: TSR (#171): 83.