Argonaut Junior

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The Argonaut Junior (1894) was the first successful submarine built by engineer Simon Lake. She was triangular, made of wood (Yellow Pine), and had three wheels to keep her from getting stuck to the sea bottom.

The Argonaut Junior was the first successful submarine built by engineer Simon Lake. Her main attribute, like that of the sub built by Lake in 1897, Argonaut (submarine), was an air lock. Her dimensions were length 14ft, beam 4 ft, depth 5 ft.[1][2] Different sources incorrectly identify "Argonaut No 1", and "Argonaut No 2" as the name of this vessel. "Argonaut No 1" was built in 1897 and is 36 feet in length, "Argonaut No 2" was a reconstruction of "Argonaut No 1" finishing in 1900 with a length of 60 feet and significantly different profile.[3]

The Argonaut Junior was built in 1894 as a prototype by Lake after he was denied a contract by the U.S. Navy. It was triangular, made of wood (Yellow Pine), and had three wheels to keep it from getting stuck to the sea bottom. She moved along the bottom of Sandy Hook Bay by one or two men cranking the axle of the two driving wheels. With sufficient air pressure in the cabin, a bottom door (air lock) could be opened and no water would come into the boat. Then by putting on a pair of rubber boots the operator could walk around on the sea bottom and push the boat along with him and pick up objects from the sea bottom. [4][5][6][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Corbin, Thomas W. Corbin (1913). The Romance of Submarine Engineering: Containing Interesting. Original from the New York Public Library: Seeley, Service & co., ltd. pp. Page 109. 
  2. ^ Herbert C. Fyfe, Edward James Reed (1907). Submarine Warfare, Past and Present. Original from the University of California: E.G. Richards. pp. Page 288. 
  3. ^ "Argonauts" (web). The Simon Lake Submarine Web Site. 2003. Archived from the original on 9 February 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-28. 
  4. ^ Lake, Simon (1918). The Submarine in War and Peace:. Original from Harvard University: J.B. Lippincott company. pp. Page 125. 
  5. ^ Doubleday, Russell (1905). The Boy's Book of Inventions:The Adventures of Inventors and Engineers. Original from the University of California: Doubleday, Page & co. pp. Page 37. 
  6. ^ Baker, Ray Stannard (1899). The Boy's Book of Inventions: Stories of the Wonders of Modern Science. Original from the New York Public Library: Doubleday & McClure co. pp. Page 38. 
  7. ^ Bishop, Farnham (1916). The Story of the Submarine. Original from the University of Michigan: The Century co. pp. Page 84. 

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