Ariana Kelly

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Ariana Brannigan Kelly
Delegate Ariana Kelly.jpg
Delegate Ariana Kelly in August 2010
Member of the Maryland House of Delegates
from the 16th district
Assumed office
January 12, 2011
Personal details
Born (1976-12-07) December 7, 1976 (age 42)
Bethesda, Maryland, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic
Children2
ResidenceBethesda, Maryland, U.S.
OccupationPolitician

Ariana Brannigan Kelly is an American politician from Maryland and a member of the Democratic Party. She currently serves in the Maryland House of Delegates. She has represented District 16 since 2010, which is located in Montgomery County, and includes Bethesda, Cabin John, Glen Echo and parts of Chevy Chase, Potomac and Rockville. Kelly lives in the Wyngate neighborhood.

Education and Professional Background[edit]

Ariana Brannigan Kelly grew up in Bethesda where she attended Walter Johnson High School. Brannigan Kelly also attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she studied History, Women's Studies, and TV/Film Production.

Brannigan Kelly has an extensive background in nonprofit management, media, and social service. In her early career, she worked at Travelers Aid International, Girls Inc, and Legal Momentum. Brannigan Kelly also produced PBSTo The Contrary, a weekly news program. She covered a wide range of issues including state and federal legislation, business, education, health, and the environment. She specialized in the perspective of underrepresented populations including women and minorities.

Brannigan Kelly also served as Executive Director at NARAL Pro-Choice Maryland where she led a nationally recognized campaign to investigate crisis pregnancy centers, and published The Truth Revealed Report[1]. Brannigan Kelly also served as a Campaign Director for MomsRising.org where she worked on Healthcare Reform, Paid Family Leave, Pay Equity, Environmental Health, and Childcare.[2]

Personal[edit]

Delegate Kelly has a daughter and a son. She is the granddaughter of Maryland fire safety pioneer Francis Brannigan. Her parents, Anne Brannigan-Kelly and Richard Kelly, reside in Colorado. Her sister, Meghan Kelly resides in North Carolina. Kelly's brother, Jonathan Blum, and sister-in-law Kate Orman are Australian science fiction authors.

On June 27, 2015, Delegate Kelly was charged for indecent exposure and trespassing at the home of her ex-husband in Bethesda, Maryland when she was there to drop off their children, and she saw his fiance. On July 21, 2015, the charges were dropped with the State's Attorney saying in a statement that the alleged incident was "a matter better suited for family court."[3][4]

Awards and honors[edit]

In the Legislature[edit]

Delegate Brannigan Kelly is a Deputy Majority Whip. She serves on the Health and Government Operations Committee where she Chairs the Health Occupations and Long Term Care Subcommittee[7]. She is also the Chair of the Economic Development Committee for Montgomery County and Democratic Caucus Chair of the Montgomery County House Delegation[8]. In addition, Brannigan Kelly is the President of Women Legislators of Maryland.[9] She is also the House Chair for the Joint Committee on Children, Youth, and Families[10].

Brannigan Kelly was the lead sponsor of Maryland's Contraceptive Equity Act which made Maryland first in the nation for ensuring access to birth control.[11] This legislation required over-the-counter insurance coverage for Emergency Contraception, no cost-sharing for vasectomies, and six-month dispensing for birth control pills, in addition to expanding the types of contraception available to Medicaid and insured populations in Maryland at no cost.

Brannigan Kelly was also the lead sponsor of legislation that established insurance network adequacy standards in Maryland.[12]

Brannigan Kelly is House Chair of the Task Force to Study Family and Medical Leave Insurance[13].

Brannigan Kelly is leading the fight to strengthen Maryland’s child care subsidy program. She was the lead sponsor of legislation to analyze the program's low reimbursement rates[14][15] and her work on the Joint Committee on Children, Youth, and Families led to successful legislation mandating increased funding levels.[16][17]

Brannigan Kelly has a 100% lifetime rating from the Maryland League of Conservation Voters on their environmental scorecard for legislators. [18]

Legislative notes[edit]

  • Lead sponsor for House Bill 251, providing for the teaching of consent education in Maryland's Family Life and Human Sexuality Curriculum[19]
  • Lead sponsor of House Bill 1342, reforming the Maryland General Assembly's sexual harassment policy and making sexual harassment by lobbyists illegal[20]
  • Lead House sponsor for House Bill 775, providing Maryland state employees with 12 weeks of paid parental leave[21]
  • Lead sponsor for House Bill 1283, requiring insurance companies to cover up to 12 months of birth control at a time[22]
  • Co-Sponsor for House Bill 1325, banning fracking in Maryland[23]
  • Lead sponsor for House Bill 1127, clarifying insurance coverage requirements for substance use disorder and mental health benefits in commercial health plans[24]
  • Lead sponsor of House Bill 1026, providing job protected parental leave at the birth or adoption of a child for those working at small businesses, who were not previously covered under the federal Family and Medical Leave Act[25]
  • Lead sponsor of House Bill 963, makes obtaining access to forensic medical services easier for sexual assault survivors[26]
  • Lead sponsor of House Bill 1191, requiring labeling of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) in raw and packaged food[27]
  • Lead sponsor of HB 798, provides parents of children with disabilities access information on habilitative services, including the Parents' Guide to Habilitative Services
  • Lead Sponsor on bill to expand insurance coverage for speech therapy, occupational therapy, and physical therapy for young adults with birth defects including cerebral palsy and autism. (HB 235)
  • Authored bill to establish a Green Chemistry Task Force in Maryland's Department of Business and Economic Development (HB 811).
  • Lead Co-Sponsor for House Bill 235 in 2011, regarding preventing discrimination in housing and employment based on gender identity or expression[28]
  • Co-Sponsor for House Bill 175 in 2011, regarding marriage equality[29]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Truth Revealed: Maryland Crisis Pregnancy Center Investigations :: NARAL Pro-Choice Maryland". www.prochoicemd.org. Archived from the original on 2017-10-09. Retrieved 2017-10-08.
  2. ^ "Ariana Kelly". MomsRising's Blog.
  3. ^ Turque, Bill (July 14, 2015). "Maryland Del. Ariana Kelly charged with indecent exposure, trespassing". The Washington Post. Retrieved July 21, 2015.
  4. ^ Turque, Bill (July 21, 2015). "Prosecutors drop trespassing, exposure charges against Md. delegate". The Washington Post. Retrieved July 21, 2015.
  5. ^ "Nonprofit Management Software, Nonprofit Fundraising Software". democracyinaction.org. Archived from the original on 2011-07-25.
  6. ^ "Delores Kelley & Ariana Kelly | 2017 Spirit of Service Awardees". Healthy Teen Network. 2017-09-29. Retrieved 2017-10-08.
  7. ^ "Maryland House Health & Government Operations Committee - Members". msa.maryland.gov. Retrieved 2017-10-08.
  8. ^ "Montgomery County Delegation Homepage". montgomerycountydelegation.com. Retrieved 2017-10-08.
  9. ^ "Maryland General Assembly Caucuses - Women Legislators of Maryland". msa.maryland.gov. Retrieved 2017-10-08.
  10. ^ "Children, Youth, & Families, Maryland Joint Committee on". msa.maryland.gov. Retrieved 2017-10-08.
  11. ^ Stolberg, Sheryl Gay (2017-06-09). "States Lead the Fight Against Trump's Birth Control Rollback". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2017-10-08.
  12. ^ "Network Adequacy Regulations Information". www.insurance.maryland.gov. Retrieved 2017-10-08.
  13. ^ "Family & Medical Leave Insurance, Maryland Task Force to Study". msa.maryland.gov. Retrieved 2017-10-08.
  14. ^ "GAM-HB0395 Summary 2017 Regular Session". mgaleg.maryland.gov. Retrieved 2018-06-06.
  15. ^ "GAM-HB0418 Summary 2017 Regular Session". mgaleg.maryland.gov. Retrieved 2018-06-06.
  16. ^ Wenger, Erin Cox, Yvonne. "Child care subsidy for working parents — neglected for decades — gets election-year attention". baltimoresun.com. Retrieved 2018-06-06.
  17. ^ Dresser, Michael. "Maryland General Assembly approves bill mandating more spending on child care subsidies". baltimoresun.com. Retrieved 2018-06-06.
  18. ^ "Maryland League of Conservation Voters | 2017 House Legislative Scorecard". Maryland League of Conservation Voters. Retrieved 2017-10-08.
  19. ^ "GAM-HB0251 Summary 2018 Regular Session". mgaleg.maryland.gov. Retrieved 2018-06-06.
  20. ^ "GAM-HB1342 Summary 2018 Regular Session". mgaleg.maryland.gov. Retrieved 2018-06-06.
  21. ^ "GAM-HB0775 Summary 2018 Regular Session". mgaleg.maryland.gov. Retrieved 2018-06-06.
  22. ^ "GAM-HB1283 Summary 2018 Regular Session". mgaleg.maryland.gov. Retrieved 2018-06-06.
  23. ^ "GAM-HB1325 Summary 2017 Regular Session". mgaleg.maryland.gov. Retrieved 2018-06-06.
  24. ^ "GAM-HB1127 Summary 2017 Regular Session". mgaleg.maryland.gov. Retrieved 2018-06-06.
  25. ^ "GAM-HB1026 Summary 2014 Regular Session". maryland.gov.
  26. ^ "GAM-HB0963 Summary 2014 Regular Session". maryland.gov.
  27. ^ "GAM-HB1191 Summary 2014 Regular Session". maryland.gov.
  28. ^ "BILL INFO-2011 Regular Session-HB 235". state.md.us.
  29. ^ "BILL INFO-2011 Regular Session-HB 175". state.md.us.

External links[edit]