Ariel 2

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Ariel 2
Ariel2 work.jpg
Ariel 2 before launch
Mission type Radio astronomy
Operator SERC / NASA
COSPAR ID 1964-015A
SATCAT № 771
Spacecraft properties
Manufacturer Westinghouse Electric
Launch mass 68 kilograms (150 lb)
Start of mission
Launch date 27 March 1964, 17:25:23 (1964-03-27UTC17:25:23Z) UTC
Rocket Scout X-3
Launch site Wallops Island LA-3
Contractor NASA
End of mission
Last contact November 1964 (1964-12)
Decay date 18 November 1967
Orbital parameters
Reference system Geocentric
Regime Low Earth
Perigee 289 kilometres (180 mi)
Apogee 1,343 kilometres (835 mi)
Inclination 51.6 degrees
Period 101.21 minutes
Epoch 3 May 1964[1]

Ariel 2, also known as UK-C, was a British radio astronomy satellite, which was operated by the Science and Engineering Research Council as part of the Ariel programme.[2] It was built in America by Westinghouse Electric,[3] and had a mass at launch of 68 kilograms (150 lb).[4][5] It was launched in 1964, and became the first satellite to be used for radio astronomy.

The launch of Ariel 2

The launch of Ariel 2 was conducted by the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration, using a Scout X-3 rocket. The launch occurred at 17:25:23 GMT on 27 March 1964, from Launch Area 3 at the Wallops Flight Facility.[6] Ariel 2 was placed into a low Earth orbit, with a perigee of 289 kilometres (180 mi), an apogee of 1,343 kilometres (835 mi), 51.6 degrees of inclination and an orbital period of 101.2 minutes as of 3 May 1964. It ceased operations in November 1964,[7] and subsequently decayed from orbit on 18 November 1967.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b McDowell, Jonathan. "Satellite Catalog". Jonathan's Space Page. Retrieved 6 December 2013. 
  2. ^ Wade, Mark. "Ariel". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Retrieved 2009-09-07. 
  3. ^ "Design of a Spacecraft". Flight International. 1965-01-21. p. 115. 
  4. ^ Krebs, Gunter. "Ariel 1, 2". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2009-09-07. 
  5. ^ "World Civil Satellites 1957-2006". Space Security Index. Retrieved 2009-09-07. 
  6. ^ McDowell, Jonathan. "Launch Log". Jonathan's Space Page. Retrieved 2009-09-07. 
  7. ^ "Traditional Micro-satellites list: 1957-1969". Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. Retrieved 2009-09-07.