Arielle Gold

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Arielle Gold
Personal information
Full name Arielle Townsend Gold[1]
Nickname(s) Ron Burgundy, Rel, Relish, Relly Belly[2][3]
Nationality American
Born (1996-05-04) May 4, 1996 (age 21)
Steamboat Springs, Colorado, U.S.
Residence Steamboat Springs, Colorado
Alma mater University of Colorado
Height 5 ft 4 in (163 cm)
Sport
Sport Snowboarding
Event(s) Halfpipe
Coached by Mike Jankowski[3]
Achievements and titles
Highest world ranking World champion (2013)
Updated on 13 February 2018.

Arielle Townsend Gold (born May 4, 1996) is an American olympic medalist snowboarder.

In 2012, she won the gold medal in the halfpipe at the FIS Junior Snowboarding World Championships, at the age of 15. The next year, she won the gold medal in the halfpipe at the FIS Snowboarding World Championships 2013, at the age of 16, becoming the second-youngest snowboarder to win a world championship.

She won a bronze medal in the superpipe at the 2013 Winter X Games XVII. In 2014, she was the youngest member of the US Sochi Winter Olympics halfpipe team, at the age of 17. However, she suffered a separated shoulder directly before the competition, and was unable to compete. Competing for the US in the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea, she won a bronze medal in the women's halfpipe event

Her older brother is Olympian snowboarder Taylor Gold.

Personal life[edit]

Gold is Jewish, and was born in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, where she attended Steamboat Springs High School.[4][5][6] Her older brother is American Olympian snowboarder Taylor Gold.[4]

She competed in rodeos and horse jumping events, before taking up snowboarding.[7] She lives in Steamboat Springs, where she attended Steamboat Springs High School.[6][8] She later transferred to the Insight School of Colorado, a full-time online public charter school that allowed her to take her classes online.[9] She is studying psychology at the University of Colorado.[10]

Her father, Ken Gold, a former professional moguls skier, videos each of her practices.[11][12] The family moves to Breckenridge, Colorado, for five months every year, to be closer to competitions.[12]

Snowboarding career[edit]

She learned to ski when she was three years old.[13] Her older brother convinced her to switch to snowboarding when she was 7.[9] She said: "Taylor made it look like so much fun".[14] Their father said:

Taylor is, in many ways, responsible for Arielle’s success because he ... told her: 'Look, most of the girls do things the way the other girls do. You need to do things the way the guys do. You need to grab your snowboard, you need to go big, you have style, you need to have aggression in your riding.'[15]

She is a member of the Steamboat Springs Winter Sports Club.[6] Her home mountain is Mount Werner in the Park Range of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado, four miles from Steamboat Springs.[16] She has competed since she was eight years old.[7]

2010–12: Junior World Champion[edit]

In 2010, she won the Burton US Open Junior Jam halfpipe contest.[17] In 2011, she won a silver medal at the U.S. Revolution Tour, Copper Mountain, Colorado, United States of America Snowboard and Freeski Association (USASA) National Championships.[6][13][17]

In 2012 at the Winter Youth Olympic Games in Innsbruck, Austria, she won silver medals in slopestyle and halfpipe. [8] She then won the gold medal in halfpipe at the FIS Junior Snowboarding World Championships in the Sierra Nevada (Spain), at the age of 15.[8][18] For 2012, she ranked 14th on the World Snowboard Tour.[6]

2013: World Champion[edit]

She won the gold medal in the halfpipe at the FIS Snowboarding World Championships 2013 in Stoneham-et-Tewkesbury, Quebec, Canada, at the age of 16, the second-youngest ever World Championship winner.[6][7][19][20] Later that week, after replacing the injured Gretchen Bleiler, Gold won a bronze medal in the superpipe at the Winter X Games XVII in Aspen, Colorado.[9][21]

She won the Burton European Open in Laax, Switzerland, came in second in the 2013 Grand Prix in Park City, Utah, in February, and won the bronze medal at X Games Europe in Tignes, France.[6][7][8] She ranked second on the 2013 World Snowboard Tour.[8] She also earned a place on the U.S. Snowboarding pro team.[8]

2014: Olympian[edit]

Gold was the youngest member of the US 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics halfpipe team at the age of 17, and was considered a medal contender in the Women's halfpipe.[22][23][24][25] But she was not able to compete in the qualification for the Olympic halfpipe finals, because of a separated right shoulder injury suffered on February 12, 2014, when she caught an edge at the end of the pipe during a practice run and crashed at Rosa Khutor Extreme Park in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia, moments before the competition.[23][24][25][26][27]

2015-17[edit]

In 2015 she finished second in the Sprint U.S. Grand Prix in Park City, Utah, third in the Burton US Open in Vail, Colorado, and fourth in the X Games in Aspen, Colorado.[10]

In 2016 she won a silver medal in the X Games in Aspen, and a bronze medal in the X Games in Oslo, Norway.[10]

She was ranked 6th in the 2017 FIS World Cup Halfpipe Standings.[10]

2018: Olympian[edit]

Competing for the United States in the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea, she won a bronze medal in the women's halfpipe event.[28]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Arielle Gold on Twitter". Twitter. 
  2. ^ "14 things you didn't know about snowboarder Arielle Gold". NBC. January 23, 2014. Retrieved April 2, 2014. 
  3. ^ a b "Arielle Gold | Snowboard | United States – Sochi 2014 Olympics". Sochi2014.com. February 23, 2014. Retrieved April 2, 2014. 
  4. ^ a b Amishai Gottlieb (February 5, 2014). "Snowboarding Siblings Among Jewish Athletes Seeking Gold in Sochi". Jewish Exponent. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  5. ^ Finkelstein, Seth (February 23, 2014). "Sizing up some of the non-Israeli Jews in Sochi". The Jerusalem Post. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g "Arielle Gold". U.S. Snowboarding. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  7. ^ a b c d "Arielle Gold – 2014 Winter Olympics – Olympic Athletes – Sochi, Russia". ESPN. May 4, 1996. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f "Arielle Gold". NBC. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  9. ^ a b c John Coon (February 11, 2014). "From Students to Sochi: Arielle Gold soars straight from Steamboat Springs High School". MaxPreps. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  10. ^ a b c d O'Connell, Ryan (February 12, 2018). "Arielle Gold: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know". Retrieved February 13, 2018. 
  11. ^ Branch, John (January 19, 2014). "U.S. Snowboarding Olympians Include Siblings". The New York Times. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  12. ^ a b Sam H. Sanders (January 18, 2014). "Sibling Snowboarders Hope To Reach Olympics At The Same Time". NPR. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  13. ^ a b "Arielle Gold". Teamusa.org. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  14. ^ Linden, Julian (January 9, 2014). "Gold targets heaven in a halfpipe". Reuters. Retrieved April 3, 2014. 
  15. ^ Branch, John (January 19, 2014). "U.S. Snowboarding Olympians Include Siblings". The New York Times. Retrieved April 5, 2014. 
  16. ^ "Arielle Gold". Burton.com. Archived from the original on August 14, 2010. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  17. ^ a b "Arielle Gold". Worldsnowboardtour.com. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  18. ^ Blevins, Jason (November 25, 2013). "Brother and sister Taylor and Arielle Gold have mettle to medal". The Denver Post. Retrieved April 2, 2014. 
  19. ^ Kelly Whiteside (January 22, 2013). "At 16, snowboarder Arielle Gold is flying high". USA Today. Retrieved January 26, 2013. 
  20. ^ "Arielle Gold – Athletes". Detourbar.com. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  21. ^ Keith Hamm (January 26, 2013). "Kelly Clark three-peats in SuperPipe". ESPN. Retrieved January 26, 2013. 
  22. ^ Chris Greenberg (February 12, 2014). "Arielle Gold Injured In Halfpipe Training, Forced To Pull Out Of Sochi Olympics Event". Huffington Post. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  23. ^ a b Rachel Axon (February 16, 2014). "Arielle Gold shares video of brutal wreck that ended her Olympics". USA Today. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  24. ^ a b Oz, Mike (February 13, 2014). "Gnarly crash ended teen snowboarder Arielle Gold's Olympics before they started | Fourth-Place Medal". Yahoo!. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  25. ^ a b Jason Blevins (February 12, 2014). "Arielle Gold of Steamboat Springs crashes in Olympic halfpipe practice". The Denver Post. Archived from the original on March 2, 2014. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  26. ^ Kelly Whiteside (March 25, 2014). "Moved by Sochi strays, Arielle Gold helps dogs at home". USA Today. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  27. ^ Luke Graham, Joel Reichenberger (February 12, 2014). "Steamboat snowboarder Arielle Gold injured, out of Olympic half-pipe event". Steamboat Pilot & Today. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  28. ^ "Chloe Kim wins Olympic halfpipe gold, USA's Arielle Gold takes bronze". Retrieved February 13, 2018. 

External links[edit]