Arilda of Oldbury

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Saint Arilda
St Arildas Church, Oldbury on Severn - geograph.org.uk - 102757.jpg
Martyr
Born unknown
possibly Gloucestershire or Wales
Died probably 5th century
Oldbury-on-Severn, Gloucestershire
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church; Anglican Communion
Major shrine St Peter's Abbey, Gloucester (destroyed)
Feast 20 July
Patronage Oldbury-on-Severn and Oldbury-on-the-Hill, Gloucestershire

Saint Arilda, or Arild, was an obscure female saint from Oldbury-on-Severn in the English county of Gloucestershire. She probably lived in the 5th or 6th century and may have been of either Anglo-Saxon or Welsh origin.

Arilda was a virgin martyr who, according to John Leland, was slain by a youth named Municus when she refused to lie with him.

Two churches in Gloucestershire are dedicated to Arilda, one at Oldbury-on-Severn near her traditional home, a second ("St Arild's Church") at Oldbury-on-the-Hill. Both places were called 'Aldberie' at the time of the Domesday Book, suggesting that their names may be derived from the saint.

There was a shrine to Arilda at St Peter's Abbey, Gloucester, which is now Gloucester Cathedral, but it was destroyed after the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

References[edit]

  • G. Jones, "Authority, Challenge and Identity in three Gloucestershire Saints' Cults", Authority and Community in the Middle Ages (ed. Donald Mowbray, Ian P. Wei, Rhiannon Purdie), 1999, ISBN 0-7509-1867-5, pp. 124–127
  • Julian M. Luxford, "The art and architecture of English Benedictine monasteries, 1300-1540: a patronage history", Boydell Press, 2005, ISBN 1-84383-153-8, p. 134
  • Alan Thacker, Richard Sharpe, "Local saints and local churches in the early medieval West", Oxford University Press, 2002, ISBN 0-19-820394-2, p. 509
  • David Verey, Gloucestershire: the Vale and the Forest of Dean, The Buildings of England edited by Nikolaus Pevsner, 2nd ed. (1976) ISBN 0-14-071041-8, p. 314
  • David Verey, Gloucestershire: the Cotswolds, The Buildings of England edited by Nikolaus Pevsner, 2nd ed. (1979) ISBN 0-14-071040-X, p. 351