Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry
Arizona Chamber Logo1.png
MottoUniting Business.
Advancing Arizona.
Established1974
Key peopleGlenn Hamer
(President & CEO)
Susan Anable
(Chairman of the Board)
Bill Terry
(Chairman-Elect)
Dawn Grove
(AMC Chairman)
Location
Address3200 North Central Avenue
Phoenix, Arizona 85012
Websitewww.azchamber.com

The Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry is an Arizona based business-advocacy group. Since 1974, the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry has been promoting statewide business advocacy at the Arizona Capitol and with the Arizona congressional delegation. Its membership employs 250,000 Arizonans from all sectors of the Arizona economy.[1] The Board of Directors of the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry is composed of more than 90 business executives, representing industries across Arizona. The Arizona Chamber is governed by the Board of Directors and its Executive Committee, including the seven board officers.[2]

Arizona Manufacturers Council[edit]

In 2007, the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry merged with the Arizona Association of Industries to create a new entity called the Arizona Manufacturers Council (AMC). The AMC deals with policy issues that impact manufacturers of all sizes statewide, including the environment, energy, education/workforce development, human resources, and intellectual property. The AMC also hosts events of special interest to the manufacturing industry. The Arizona Manufacturers Council is the official state affiliate of the National Association of Manufacturers.

Arizona Chamber Foundation[edit]

Senator Jon Kyl and then Congressman Jeff Flake speaking at the annual Update from Capitol Hill Luncheon where Senator Jon Kyl was presented the 2012 Milton Friedman Award
Retired ASU Football Head Coach Frank Kush accepts the 2011 Arizona Heritage Award presented by the Arizona Chamber.

In 2009, the Arizona Chamber Foundation was established in order to provide more detailed policy analysis on legislative issues. The Arizona Chamber Foundation is a 501(c)3 non-partisan, educational and research foundation. The Foundation produces research studies on Arizona public policy in an effort to inform policy makers, business leaders, and the general public. The mission of the Arizona Chamber Foundation is to be a resource for research and analysis on public policy issues that impact Arizona’s business environment with a focus on the core drivers of economic prosperity. Many of the Arizona Chamber Foundation’s recommendations have gone on to become law.[3][4]

Advocacy[edit]

Each year the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry produces a business agenda on items it focuses on for both the state and federal level. This document outlines the business community’s positions on the most important public policy issues facing Arizona employers. The Arizona Chamber advocacy team uses the agenda as a road-map for legislative activities at the Arizona State Capitol on behalf of business statewide. The Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry is listed as a major contributor to "Arizonans for Responsible Drug Policy,"[5] a group that seeks to continue institutional violent acts, including arrest and imprisonment, towards American citizens for marijuana possession.[6]

Committees[edit]

The Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry has sixteen policy committees. Each committee is responsible for a policy area of particular importance to the Arizona business community. These committees set the agenda for the Arizona Chamber's legislative priorities for their respective topics. All Arizona Chamber members are welcome to join policy committees that are relevant to their expertise and the needs of their companies.

Super-PAC[edit]

In 2011, the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry formed a Super-PAC. The aim of the PAC is to promote candidates who support the Chamber’s mission and its business agenda of promoting economic growth for Arizona.[7] The Chamber also hosts an annual Political Academy forum where they reach out to potential candidates for public office and help train them on politics, policy, and governance.[8]

Awards[edit]

The Arizona Capitol Times named the Arizona Chamber a Public Policy Leader of the Year in 2007. The Associated Press called the Arizona Chamber "Arizona's leading business lobby."[9]

Arizona Heritage Award[edit]

Each year, the Arizona Chamber honors a distinguished individual with the Arizona Heritage Award. The Award is given to those whose accomplishments and commitments to Arizona are recognized in Arizona, nationally, and internationally. Past recipients of the award have included Associate Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, Congressman Mo Udall, Senator Barry Goldwater, businessman Jerry Colangelo, Senator John McCain, and Senator Jon Kyl.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry - Mission". Azchamber.com. Retrieved 2012-11-08.
  2. ^ "Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry - Board Of Directors". Azchamber.com. Retrieved 2012-11-08.
  3. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-08-13. Retrieved 2012-10-18.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ http://www.azchamber.com/uploads/Legislative%20Wrap%20Up%202012%20FINAL%20for%20Website.pdf[permanent dead link]
  5. ^ "Arizonans for Responsible Drug Policy, AZ PAC - About | Facebook". www.facebook.com. Retrieved 2016-08-20.
  6. ^ "Explanation of The Regulation and Taxation of Marijuana Act "RTMA"" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-09-14.
  7. ^ Jeremy Duda (2010-06-25). "Business groups move to center Arizona Capitol Times Election Coverage". Azcapitoltimes.com. Retrieved 2012-11-08.
  8. ^ Phoenix Business Journal by Lynn Ducey (2011-09-27). "Local business groups launch Arizona Political Academy - Phoenix Business Journal". Bizjournals.com. Retrieved 2012-11-08.
  9. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-10-13. Retrieved 2012-10-12.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  10. ^ Smith, J. Brian (2005). John J. Rhodes: Man Of The House. American Traveler Press. p. 314. ISBN 978-0935810745.