Armstrong Siddeley Tiger

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For the 1920 V12 engine, see Siddeley Tiger
Tiger
ASTiger.JPG
Armstrong Siddeley Tiger at the Science Museum (London)
Type Radial engine
Manufacturer Armstrong Siddeley
First run 1932
Major applications Armstrong Whitworth Ensign
Blackburn Shark

The Armstrong Siddeley Tiger was a British 14-cylinder air-cooled aircraft radial engine developed by Armstrong Siddeley in the 1930s from their Jaguar engine. The engine was built in a number of different versions but performance and dimensions stayed relatively unchanged. The Tiger VIII was the first British aircraft engine to use a two-speed supercharger.[1][2]

Applications[edit]

Engines on display[edit]

A preserved Armstrong Siddeley Tiger is on display at the Science Museum (London).

Specifications (Tiger VIII)[edit]

Data from Lumsden.[3]

General characteristics

  • Type: 14-cylinder supercharged two-row air-cooled radial engine
  • Bore: 5.5 in (139.7 mm)
  • Stroke: 6.0 in (152.4 mm)
  • Displacement: 1,995 in³ (32.7 l)
  • Length: 64.6 in (1,641 mm)
  • Diameter: 50.8 in (1,290 mm)
  • Dry weight: 1,287 lb (584 kg)

Components

Performance

  • Power output:
  • 907 hp (677 kW) at 2,375 rpm for takeoff
  • 850 hp (634 kW) at 2,450 rpm at 7,150 ft (2,180 m) – first supercharger gear
  • 771 hp (575 kW) at 2,450 rpm at 16,240 ft (4,950 m) – second supercharger gear
  • 582 hp (434 kW) at 2,200 rpm economy cruise
  • Specific power: 0.45 hp/in³ (20.7 kW/l)
  • Compression ratio: 6.25:1
  • Specific fuel consumption: 0.49 lb/(hp•h) (294 g/(kW•h))
  • Oil consumption: 0.21–0.42 oz/(hp•h) (8–16 g/(kW•h))
  • Power-to-weight ratio: 0.70 hp/lb (1.16 kW/kg)

See also[edit]

Related development
Related lists

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Lumsden 2003, p.78.
  2. ^ Gunston 1989, p.18.
  3. ^ Lumsden 2003, p.79.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Gunston, Bill. World Encyclopedia of Aero Engines. Cambridge, England. Patrick Stephens Limited, 1989. ISBN 1-85260-163-9
  • Lumsden, Alec. British Piston Engines and their Aircraft. Marlborough, Wiltshire: Airlife Publishing, 2003. ISBN 1-85310-294-6.

External links[edit]