Arrufiac

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Arrufiac
Grape (Vitis)
Color of berry skinBlanc
SpeciesVitis vinifera
Also calledSee list of synonyms
OriginFrance
Notable winesPacherenc du Vic-Bilh

Arrufiac (or Arrufiat) is a white French wine grape variety[1] that is primarily planted in the Gascony region of South West France. It is a secondary grape in the wines from the Pacherenc du Vic-Bilh Appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC).[2] While the grape has had a long history being blended with Petit Courbu in Gascon wines, it has only recently experienced a resurgence of interest in the late 20th century following the release of white blends from Andrė Dubosc of Producteurs Plaimont, one of the region's largest co-operative wineries, in the 1980s.[3]

Wine regions[edit]

The Gascony region where Arrufiac has been historically grown.

Arrufiac has had a long history of use in the wines of Gascony, particularly those from the AOC region of Pacherenc du Vic-Bilh near Madiran and those from the Béarn AOC in the Vic-Bilh hills.[4] There, the grape was often blended with Petit Courbu which, along with Arrufiac's distinctive gunflint aroma, gave the wines of Pacherenc du Vic-Bilh a distinctive contrast to the white wines of nearby Jurançon.[3] Additionally, winemakers in Gascony have blended Arrufiac with the other grapes of Jurançon, Petit Manseng and Gros Manseng.[4]

Wine styles[edit]

Arrufiac is used primarily as a blending wine with its medium body and relatively low alcohol levels for a wine grown in southern France. In blends, its main contribution is in the aroma and bouquet, with wines featuring Arrufiac often marked by a distinctive gunflint note.[3]

Synonyms[edit]

Arrufiac and its wines are known under a variety of synonyms including Ambre, Arafiat, Arrefiac, Arrefiat, Arrufiat, Arufiat, Raffiac, Raffiat, Refiat, Rouffiac Femelle, Ruffiac, Ruffiac Blanc, and Rufiat.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Arrufiac, Vitis International Variety Catalogue, accessed on June 26, 2010
  2. ^ J. Robinson Jancis Robinson's Wine Course Third Edition pg 100 Abbeville Press 2003 ISBN 0-7892-0883-0
  3. ^ a b c J. Robinson Jancis Robinson's Guide to Wine Grapes pg 24 Oxford University Press 1996 ISBN 0-19-860098-4
  4. ^ a b Oz Clarke Encyclopedia of Grapes pg 38 Harcourt Books 2001 ISBN 0-15-100714-4