Arsenal Design Bureau

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Arsenal Design Bureau
Federal State Unitary Enterprise
IndustryAerospace, arms industry
Founded21 November 1949
Headquarters,
Russia
ProductsMissiles, ICMBs, artillery, spacecraft, satellites
ParentRoscosmos[1]
Websitekbarsenal.ru

Arsenal Design Bureau (Russian: Конструкторское бюро «Арсенал», romanizedKonstruktorskoye byuro Arsenal) is an engineering company active in the fields of space technology, ship artillery and civilian machine building. The company was founded in 1711 and is located in Saint Petersburg in the Russian Federation. Its full name is Arsenal Design Bureau named after Mikhail Vasil’evich Frunze Federal State Unitary Enterprise.[2]

Overview[edit]

The company's main purpose is development and operation of space complexes and spacecraft for various purposes, and development and creation of navy artillery mounts and launchers.[2][3] KB Arsenal is the developer of Liana electronic reconnaissance program, intended to replace the EORSATS and Tselina 2.[4]

History[edit]

KB Arsenal was founded in 1711 by Tsar Peter I of Russia as a cannon foundry.[4] Renamed to TsBK-7, the company created ICBMs between 1960 and 1980, after which it switched its focus to space research. It is the developer of over 80 spacecraft in the COSMOS series, including Russia's first nuclear power system satellites, the Kosmos 1818 and Kosmos 1867.[3] It is the oldest Russian/Soviet design bureau connected to space research.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "О мерах по созданию Государственной корпорации по космической деятельности "Роскосмос"". Официальный интернет-портал правовой информации. Retrieved 15 April 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Company profile". KB Arsenal. Archived from the original on 2010-06-01. Retrieved 2009-07-25.
  3. ^ a b "KB Arsenal (Russian Federation), Space industry - Prime contractors". Jane's Space Systems and Industry. 2009-07-14. Retrieved 2009-07-25.
  4. ^ a b c Harvey, Brian (2007). "The design bureaus". The Rebirth of the Russian Space Program (1st ed.). Germany: Springer. ISBN 978-0-387-71354-0.

External links[edit]