Art Deco Architecture: Design, Decoration and Detail from the Twenties and Thirties

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Art Deco Architecture: Design, Decoration and Detail from the Twenties and Thirties
Art deco architecture -- bookcover.jpg
Hardcover edition
Author Patricia Bayer
Country United States
Language English
Subject History of art
Art Deco architecture
Genre Non-fiction
Published October 1992
Publisher Harry N. Abrams
Media type Print
Pages 224 pp.
ISBN 978-0810919235
OCLC 25509002

Art Deco Architecture: Design, Decoration and Detail from the Twenties and Thirties is an illustrated book by American art historian Patricia Bayer. The book was initially published in October 1992 by Harry N. Abrams.[1][2][3] Patricia Bayer is an art historian living in Connecticut and writing extensively on Art Deco design. Her other books include Art Deco Interiors and Art Deco Postcards.[4] The book contains 376 Illustrations, 146 in colour.[5]

Content[edit]

  1. Introduction
  2. Influences, Precursors and Parallels
  3. International Expositions
  4. Residences and Hotels
  5. Public Buildings, Office Buildings, Factories, Stores, Restaurants, Cinemas, Theatres, Travel Buildings, Civic Structures, Churches and Monuments
  6. Revivals and Replicas

Review[edit]

From a sleekly modern apartment house in Cairo to a town hall in the Netherlands, architecture was influenced internationally by the Art Deco style, as revealed by this wide-angled, superbly illustrated survey. Bayer (The Art of Rene Lalique) first uncovers Art Deco's ancient and exotic sources, from Assyrian to Mayan to Moorish. Her text, wedded to 376 jazzy, snazzy illustrations (146 in color), demonstrates how this vibrant, decorative style extended between the wars into every nook and cranny of the U.S. leaving its mark on skyscrapers, movie theaters, firehouses, factories, dams, tunnels, high schools, gas stations, roadside diners and even gravestones. Bayer also examines the Art Deco revival, citing restored Miami Beach hotels as well as public buildings by Michael Graves, Robert Venturi and Helmut Jahn that echo or evoke Art Deco, a style "at once traditional and innovative."

Publishers Weekly[6]

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