Art Duncan

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For other people with the same name, see Arthur Duncan (disambiguation).
Art Duncan
ArtDuncan cropped.jpg
Art Duncan with the Vancouver Millionaires, 1918–19
Born (1891-07-04)July 4, 1891
Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada
Died April 13, 1975(1975-04-13) (aged 83)
Aurora, Ontario, Canada
Occupation ice hockey player, coach and executive

Ice hockey career
Height 6 ft 1 in (185 cm)
Weight 190 lb (86 kg; 13 st 8 lb)
Position Defenceman
Shot Right
Played for Edmonton Eskimos
Vancouver Millionaires
Toronto 228th Battalion
Vancouver Maroons
Calgary Tigers
Detroit Cougars
Toronto Maple Leafs
Playing career 1913–1931
Military career
Military Cross.jpg
Military cross w bar BAR.svg
Allegiance Canada
Service/branch Infantry; aviation
Years of service 1916–1919
Rank Captain
Unit 228th Battalion CEF, No. 60 Squadron RAF
Awards Military Cross with Bar

Captain William James Arthur "Art" Duncan MC (July 4, 1891 – April 13, 1975) was a Canadian aviator and a professional ice hockey player, coach, and general manager. In 1926 he served as the first team captain, head coach, and general manager of the Detroit Cougars of the National Hockey League (NHL).

He interrupted his sports career to serve in World War I, and became a fighter ace credited with 11 official aerial victories.

Early life and service[edit]

Born in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Duncan debuted in professional hockey in the 1915–16 season.[1]

Duncan's October 1, 1916 enlistment papers gave his occupation as accountant. He listed his next of kin as his mother, Mrs. W. A. Duncan. He listed his home address as his mother's place in Toronto. He also claimed to be serving in the 34th Regiment of the militia, which may be the basis for his direct commissioning as an officer.[2]

During the 1916 and 1917 hockey seasons, Duncan continued to play, as his battalion fielded a team in the National Hockey Association both years. His transfer to France cut off his sporting career.[3]

World War I[edit]

Duncan first served with the 228th Battalion CEF in France as a lieutenant.[4] On August 1, 1917, Lieutenant W. J. A. Duncan of the Canadian Railway Troops was appointed a Flying Officer in the Royal Flying Corps[5] and seconded for duty with them.[6] He was transferred to the Royal Flying Corps and assigned to 60 Squadron in September 1917 as a Royal Aircraft Factory SE.5a pilot with a roving commission.[7]

Duncan scored his first aerial victory on November 6, 1917, when he destroyed a German DFW reconnaissance plane northeast of Polygon Wood. He began to accumulate wins. On the day the RFC was consolidated into the Royal Air Force, April 1, 1918, he shared his seventh victory with American ace John Griffith. On May 17, 1918, he raised his tally to nine.[8] The next day, he was promoted to temporary captain.[9] He would score twice more after that, destroying an LVG on June 3 and busting a German observation balloon on June 5, 1918. He was returned to Home Establishment on June 30, 1918. A summary of his victories included an enemy observation balloon destroyed, an enemy fighter plane captured, seven enemy planes destroyed (including four shared wins), and two enemy airplanes driven down out of control.[10]

His combat exploits won him the award of the Military Cross, gazetted on July 26, 1918: For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On one occasion he attacked and shot down an enemy plane which had been engaged at firing on our infantry. He then led his patrol over the enemy's lines, dived down to an altitude of 100 feet, and attacked large numbers of hostile infantry with machinegun fire, causing the utmost panic amongst them and inflicting heavy casualties. His continuous gallantry and initiative have been most conspicuous.[11]

An award of a Bar to the Military Cross in lieu of a second award followed on September 16, 1918: For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This officer sighted fifteen enemy scouts attacking eight of ours and immediately joined in, destroying one enemy aeroplane, which fell with a wing off. He then attacked and drove down three other machines, maintaining the fight until the eight had got back to their lines. He has also, with another officer, destroyed an Albatros scout, which he followed down to a height of 200 feet, in spite of heavy machine-gun fire from the ground.[12]

Post World War I[edit]

On March 31, 1919, Duncan resigned his commission upon ceasing to be employed by the Royal Air Force.[13]

He played eight seasons in the Pacific Coast Hockey Association with the Vancouver Millionaires (1915–16; 1918–19–1921–22) and Vancouver Maroons (1922–23–1924–25). He played with the Calgary Tigers of the Western Canada Hockey League for one season (1925–26). He also played with the Detroit Cougars (1926–27) and Toronto Maple Leafs (1927–281931–32) in the National Hockey League. Duncan served as player-coach with both the Cougars and the Maple Leafs.

Duncan died in 1975 in Aurora, Ontario.

Career statistics[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1912–13 Sudbury Wolves NOHA
1913–14 Edmonton Eskimos ASHL 5 2 0 2 16 3 1 0 1 3
1914–15 Edmonton Albertas ASHL 3 1 0 1 11
1915–16 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 17 7 4 11 25
1916–17 Toronto 228th Battalion NHA 6 3 1 4 6
1918–19 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 17 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 0
1919–20 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 22 5 9 14 3 2 0 0 0 0
1920–21 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 24 3 5 8 6 2 0 3 3 0
1920–21 Vancouver Millionaires St-Cup 5 2 1 3 3
1921–22 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 24 5 9 14 25 2 0 0 0 0
1921–22 Vancouver Millionaires West-P 2 3 0 3 0
1921–22 Vancouver Millionaires St-Cup 5 0 1 1 9
1922–23 Vancouver Maroons PCHA 25 15 6 21 8 2 1 0 1 0
1922–23 Vancouver Maroons St-Cup 4 2 2 4 0
1923–24 Vancouver Maroons PCHA 30 21 10 31 44 2 0 1 1 4
1923–24 Vancouver Maroons West-P 3 1 1 2 2
1924–24 Vancouver Maroons St-Cup 2 0 0 0 6
1924–25 Vancouver Maroons WCHL 26 5 5 10 28
1925–26 Calgary Tigers WHL 29 9 4 13 30
1926–27 Detroit Cougars NHL 34 3 2 5 26
1927–28 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 43 7 5 12 97
1928–29 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 39 4 4 8 53 4 0 0 0 4
1929–30 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 38 4 5 9 49
1930–31 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
PCHA totals 159 58 44 102 111 12 1 4 5 4
St-Cup totals 16 4 4 8 18
WCHL/WHL totals 55 14 9 23 58
NHL totals 156 18 16 34 225 5 0 0 0 4

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.theaerodrome.com/aces/canada/duncan2.php Retrieved March 14, 2011.
  2. ^ http://www.theaerodrome.com/aces/canada/attestation/duncan2.php Retrieved March 14, 2011.
  3. ^ http://www.theaerodrome.com/aces/canada/attestation/duncan2.php Retrieved March 14, 2011.
  4. ^ http://www.theaerodrome.com/aces/canada/attestation/duncan2.php Retrieved March 14, 2011.
  5. ^ (Supplement to the London Gazette, October 16, 1917) http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/30335/supplements/10586 Retrieved March 14, 2011.
  6. ^ (Supplement to the London Gazette, November 3, 1917) http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/30366/supplements/11427 Retrieved March 14, 2011.
  7. ^ http://www.theaerodrome.com/aces/canada/duncan2.php Retrieved March 14, 2011.
  8. ^ http://www.theaerodrome.com/aces/canada/duncan2.php Retrieved March 14, 2011.
  9. ^ (Flight, June 20, 1918) http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1918/1918%20-%200697.html?search=W.%20J.%20A.%20Duncan Note: Promotion to temporary captain was usually accompanied by an appointment to Flight Commander. Retrieved March 16, 2011.
  10. ^ http://www.theaerodrome.com/aces/canada/duncan2.php Retrieved March 14, 2011.
  11. ^ (Supplement to the London Gazette, July 26, 1918) http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/30813/supplements/8861 Retrieved March 14, 2011.
  12. ^ (Supplement to the London Gazette, September 16, 1918) http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/30901/supplements/10908 Retrieved March 14, 2011.
  13. ^ (The London Gazette, May 20, 1919) http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/31348/pages/6250 Retrieved March 14, 2011.

External links[edit]

Preceded by
new creation
Detroit Cougars captain
1926–27
Succeeded by
Reg Noble
Preceded by
None
Head coach of the Detroit Cougars
1926–27
Succeeded by
Duke Keats
Preceded by
Conn Smythe
Head coach of the Toronto Maple Leafs
193032
Succeeded by
Dick Irvin
Preceded by
Position created
General Manager of the Detroit Red Wings
1926–27
Succeeded by
Jack Adams