Art punk

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Art punk is a category of punk bands who are more sophisticated than their peers and go beyond the genre's garage rock foundations.[1] These groups generated punk's aesthetic of being simple, offensive, and free-spirited, in contrast to the angry, working-class audience generated by pub rock.[2] In the late 1970s, the term was used as a pejorative for post-punk bands who were out of step with the genre's ideologies.[1]

History[edit]

In the rock music of the 1970s, the "art" descriptor was generally understood to mean either "aggressively avant-garde" or "pretentiously progressive".[3] Musicologists Simon Frith and Howard Horne described the band managers of the 1970s punk bands as "the most articulate theorists of the art punk movement", with Bob Last of Fast Product identified as one of the first to apply art theory to marketing, and Tony Wilson's Factory Records described as "applying the Bauhaus principle of the same 'look' for all the company's goods".[4] Wire's Colin Newman described art punk in 2006 as "the drug of choice of a whole generation".[5]

Anna Szemere traces the beginnings of the Hungarian art-punk subculture to 1978, when punk band the Spions performed three concerts which drew on conceptualist performance art and Antonin Artaud's "theatre of cruelty", with neo-avant-garde/anarchist manifestos handed out to the audience.[6]

List of artists[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Gittins 2004, p. 5.
  2. ^ a b c d Desrosiers, Mark (November 8, 2001). "25 Up: Punk's Silver Jubilee: Aesthetic Anesthetic: Liberating the Punk Canon". PopMatters. 
  3. ^ Murray, Noel (May 28, 2015). "60 minutes of music that sum up art-punk pioneers Wire". The A.V. Club. 
  4. ^ Frith, Simon & Horne, Howard (1987) Art into Pop, Methuen, ISBN 978-0-416-41540-7, p. 129-130
  5. ^ Newman, Colin (2006) "Wire: the art-punk band's journey and legacy", The Independent, 17 February 2006
  6. ^ Szemere, Anna (1997) Up from the Underground: The Culture of Rock Music in Postsocialist Hungary, Pennsylvania State University Press, ISBN 978-0-271-02133-1, p. 41
  7. ^ Goldberg, Michael Alan (2003) "Hanging on the Art Punk Edge: The A-Frames' Beautifully Dark Constructions", The Stranger, 30 January - 5 February 2003
  8. ^ Schild, Matt "It's a Bit Complicated - Art Brut", Aversion.com[dead link]
  9. ^ Ham, Robert (15 February 2010). "Past Lives: Seattle art-punk band lives on". The Oregonian. 
  10. ^ a b Kaplan, E. Ann (1988) Postmodernism and Its Discontents: Theories, Practices, Verso Books, ISBN 978-0-86091-211-8
  11. ^ Горбачев, Александр. Зинин, Илья. Песни в пустоту (фрагмент). colta.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 1 October 2014. 
  12. ^ Heather (2013) " Clinic Biography", "allmusic", 14 September 2016
  13. ^ Lyskey, Dorian (2007) "Jeffrey Lewis, 12 Crass Songs", The Guardian, 28 September 2007
  14. ^ Karan, Tim (2006) "Spazmo art-punk with a psychobilly edge", Alternative Press, 6 December 2006
  15. ^ Interview with David Byrne, The Guardian 27 April 2001
  16. ^ Milian, Ray (2011) "[1]", Off The Radar Music, 4 April 2011
  17. ^ Pat Long (2 May 2009). "Pat Long meets new wave 80s oddballs Devo, who are intent on making a comeback | Music". London: The Guardian. Retrieved 2012-05-26. 
  18. ^ SPECIAL RADIO Sergueï Létov
  19. ^ Hopper, Justin. "The Ex: 27 Years of Dutch Art-punk". Pittsburgh City Paper, December 7, 2006. Retrieved on November 14, 2010.
  20. ^ "Nightlife", New York, 12 September 1994, p. 175
  21. ^ "CJA". Archived from the original on 9 May 2013. Retrieved 24 July 2013. 
  22. ^ Crisafulli, Chuck (2003) Nirvana: Teen Spirit: The Stories Behind Every Song, Da Capo, ISBN 978-1-56025-558-1
  23. ^ a b c Muggleton, David & Weinzierl, Rupert (2003) The Post-subcultures Reader, Berg, ISBN 978-1-85973-668-5, p. 245
  24. ^ Brookes, Tim (2006) Guitar: An American Life, Grove/Atlantic, ISBN 978-0-8021-4258-0
  25. ^ Wells, Steven (2004) Punk: Young, Loud & Snotty: the Stories Behind the Songs, Thunder Mouth Press, ISBN 978-1-56025-573-4, p. 65
  26. ^ Caramanica, Jon (2008) "Staging Their Happenings in an Art-Punk Mode, Embracing the Threat of Chaos", New York Times, 8 May 2008
  27. ^ Taylor, Steve (2004) The A to X of Alternative Music, Continuum, ISBN 0-8264-7396-2, p. 154, 249
  28. ^ Ware, Tony (2008) "Athens Art Punk", SF Weekly, 11 November 2008
  29. ^ a b Reddington, Helen (2007) The Lost Women of Rock Music: Female Musicians of the Punk Era, Ashgate, ISBN 978-0-7546-5773-6, p. 47
  30. ^ Lynskey, Dorian (2007) "The drinking person's thinking band", The Guardian, 27 February 2007
  31. ^ https://www.allmusic.com/album/r528769
  32. ^ Brackett, Nathan & Hoard, Christian (eds.) (2004) The New "Rolling Stone" Album Guide, 4th edn., Simon & Schuster, ISBN 978-0-7432-0169-8, p.430
  33. ^ "All-Star Suicide Tribute". Clash. Retrieved April 11, 2015. 
  34. ^ Gittins, Ian. Talking Heads: Once in a Lifetime : the Stories Behind Every Song. Hal Leonard Corporation, 2004. p. 5.
  35. ^ "Thursday, September 29". Now Toronto. September 29, 2005. Archived from the original on January 12, 2014. Retrieved January 10, 2014. 
  36. ^ Meagher, John (May 31, 2015). "Music - Television: NYC's art-punk pioneers". Irish Independent. Retrieved October 30, 2015. 
  37. ^ Kot, Greg (2003) "Wire delivers high-voltage act; The art-punk foursome from Britain is back with a new, brutal style ", Chicago Tribune, 27 June 2003
  38. ^ [2] Hill, Eric."We Are Wolves' Art of Noise", Exclaim!, June 2009.
  39. ^ Crandall, Bill (August 8, 1997). "NO EXIT: XTC's Andy Partridge". Bam. 
  40. ^ McLean, Craig (June 13, 2009). "Yeah Yeah Yeahs: why fans of the art-punk trio can't say no". The Times. Retrieved January 2, 2010. 
  41. ^ Soviet New Wave, 1987: "Grey Pigeon" by Pyotr Mamonov and Zvuki Mu

Bibliography[edit]