Arthur Bates Jennings

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Arthur Bates Jennings
Born1849[1]
Died(1927-03-30)March 30, 1927[2]
NationalityAmerican
OccupationArchitect
George Daiker Houses, New York, NY. 1889–90.
Westminster Presbyterian Church, Bloomfield, NJ. 1890–92.
Summit Playhouse, Summit, NJ. 1891.
All Saints Memorial Episcopal Church, Meriden, CT. 1892–93.

Arthur Bates Jennings (1849 – March 30, 1927) was an American architect, working primarily out of New York City.[1][2]

Career[edit]

He earned an A.B. from College of the City of New York in 1870 and trained in architecture under George B. Post and Russell Sturgis.[1] He opened an office in Manhattan around 1876. His early career focused on residential designs, later expanding into public buildings, including churches and college buildings.[1] He is known for his multi-turreted churches.[1] His buildings were constructed across the United States, from Portland, ME to Seattle, WA.[1] He retired in 1919.

Works[edit]

  • James V. S. Woolley Houses, 115-121 E. 91st St., New York, NY (1876–77)[3]
  • John P. Allen House, 66 New England Ave., Summit, NJ (1881) - Demolished.[4]
  • Lucien C. Warner House, 2042 5th Ave., New York, NY (1883) - Demolished.[5]
  • Charles L. Guillaume Houses, 133-145 W. 87th St., New York, NY (1884)[6]
  • Stephen F. Sherman House, 410 Riverside Dr., New York, NY (1884) - Better known as the residence of George Noakes. Demolished in 1906.[1][7]
  • Warner Hall, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH (1884) - Formerly part of the conservatory complex. Demolished.[8]
  • Joseph J. Kittell House, 495 Riverside Dr., New York, NY (1885) - Demolished, now part of the site of the Riverside Church.[9]
  • Joseph T. Low House, 76 Rumson Rd., Rumson, NJ (1885) - Demolished.[7]
  • S. Bayard Dod House, 302 S. Harrison St., East Orange, NJ (1885) - Demolished in 1941.[7]
  • David S. Brown Houses, 170-176 W. 72nd St., New York, NY (1886) - Built by Brown and various family members. No. 174, the only survivor, was occupied by Albert S. Roe.[10] No. 172 was occupied by Jacob A. Chamberlain.
  • E. August Neresheimer House, 176 Malcolm X Blvd., New York, NY (1886) - Demolished in 1901.[1]
  • Norumbega, 63 High St., Camden, ME (1886–87) - The home of Weld native Joseph B. Stearns. Now the Norumbega Inn.[11]
  • John J. Gibbons House, 494 Riverside Dr., New York, NY (1887) - Demolished and part of the Riverside Church site.[12]
  • Christian Blinn House, 3 W. 81st St., New York, NY (1888) - Demolished.[13]
  • Denny Hotel, 3rd Ave. & Virginia St., Seattle, WA (1888–93) - Construction resumed and completed in 1903 as the Washington Hotel. Demolished in 1906 when Denny Hill was leveled.[14]
  • Burrage Library, Olivet College, Olivet, MI (1889–90)[15]
  • George Daiker Houses, 718-730 St. Nicholas Ave., New York, NY (1889–90)[16]
  • J. C. Desuris House, 607 W. 113th St., New York, NY (1889) - Demolished in 1910.[17]
  • First Baptist Church, 212 S. Lincoln St., Spokane, WA (1890) - Demolished.[18]
  • Webb's Academy and Home for Shipbuilders, Forham Hill Oval, Bronx, NY (1890–93) - Demolished.[19]
  • Westminster Presbyterian Church, 449 Franklin St., Bloomfield, NJ (1890–92) - Now the Westminster Arts Center of Bloomfield College.[1]
  • George E. Clay House, 21-49 45th Rd., Long Island City, NY (1891) - Originally numbered 167 11th St.[1]
  • Summit Library, 10 New England Ave., Summit, NJ (1891)
  • All Saints Memorial Episcopal Church, 201 W. Main St., Meriden, CT (1892–93)[1]
  • Gymnasium, Washington & Jefferson College, Washington, PA (1892–93) - Now known as the Swanson Wellness Center.[20]
  • St. Timothy's Episcopal Church, 226 S. E. 3rd St., Massillon, OH (1892)
  • Cranston Street Baptist Church, 475 Cranston St., Providence, RI (1893)[21]
  • Hanover Fire Insurance Co. Building, 34 Pine St., New York, NY (1893–94) - Demolished.[22]
  • Bay Ridge Reformed Church, 8101 Ridge Blvd., Brooklyn, NY (1896–97)[16]
  • First Baptist Church, 202 Milton Ave., Ballston Spa, NY (1896)[1]
  • Bedford Presbyterian Church, 1200 Dean St., Brooklyn, NY (1897) - Expanded to the south in 1906.[23]
  • Penn Yan M. E. Church, 166 Main St., Penn Yan, NY (1897–99)[1]
  • St. Lawrence Congregational Church, 76 Congress St., Portland, ME (1897) - Demolished in 2008. Parish house extant.
  • First Reformed Church, Clinton & Johnson Aves., Newark, NJ (1898) - Demolished.[1]
  • Grace Street Baptist Church, Grace & Foushee Sts., Richmond, VA (1898) - Burned.[1]
  • Second Congregational Church, 800 Main St., Winsted, CT (1898)[24]
  • First Congregational Church, 95 N. Main St., Winsted, CT (1900–01)[1]
  • New England Congregational Church, 125 Circular St., Saratoga Springs, NY (1900) - The belfry has been removed.[1]
  • First Baptist Church, 301 S. Pittsburgh St., Connellsville, PA (1901–03)[1]
  • First Reformed Church, 23 Kinderhook St., Chatham, NY (1901)[1]
  • First Baptist Church, E. Jefferson St. & 2nd St. N. E., Charlottesville, VA (1904) - Burned.[1]
  • Salem Baptist Church, 438 Main St., New Rochelle, NY (1904) - Burned in 2011.
  • Central M. E. Church, Central Ave. & Chapel St., Hot Springs, AR (1908) - Burned.[25]
  • First Baptist Church, 229 N. King St., Hampton, VA (1909) - Burned in 1914.[26]
  • First Baptist Church, Westover & Moran Aves., Norfolk, VA (1909–10) - Burned.T[1]
  • Rice Memorial Hall, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH (1909–10) - Formerly part of the conservatory complex. Top floor removed.[8]
  • First M. E. Church, 17 E. 6th St., Dunkirk, NY (1916)[1]

Personal[edit]

He married Caroline Jerusha Allen of West Meriden, Connecticut and had three children, Edward Allen, Arthur Bates, Jr., and Helen Bates.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w "Guide to the Jennings Photograph Collection [1858]-1957 PR 135" dlib.nyu.edu/. New York Historical Society, 2011. Web.
  2. ^ a b c "Obituary: Arthur Bates Jennings". The New York Times. April 1, 1927.
  3. ^ Expanded Carnegie Hill Historic District. New York: New York Landmarks Preservation Commission, 1993.
  4. ^ Martin, Cynthia B. Images of America: Summit Historic Homes. Charleston: Arcadia, 2013.
  5. ^ Sanitary Engineer 26 April 1883: 490.
  6. ^ Building Aug. 1884: 184.
  7. ^ a b c Lewis, Arnold. American Country Houses of the Gilded Age. New York: Dover, 1982. Print.
  8. ^ a b Blodgett, Geoffrey. Oberlin Architecture: College and Town. Oberlin: Oberlin College, 1985.
  9. ^ American Architect and Building News 6 Dec. 1884: 276.
  10. ^ Samitary Engineer 25 March 1886: 401.
  11. ^ Norumbega NRHP Nomination. Washington: United States Department of the Interior, 1974.
  12. ^ American Architect and Building News 1 Jan. 1887: 3.
  13. ^ Engineering and Building Record 24 Dec. 1888: 64.
  14. ^ "Denny Hotel, Seattle, WA" digital.lib.washington.edu. Pacific Coast Architecture Database, n. d. Web.
  15. ^ Exercises and Addresses at the Dedication of the New Library Building, Olivet College, June 19, 1890. OLivet: Frank N. Green, 1890.
  16. ^ a b Dolkart, Andrew S. (1998). Morningside Heights: A History of its Architecture and Development. New York, NY: Columbia University Press. pp. 28–29. ISBN 978-0-231-07850-4. OCLC 37843816.
  17. ^ Engineering and Building Record 31 Dec. 1888: 80
  18. ^ Real Estate Record and Builders' Guide 3 Aug. 1889: 1077.
  19. ^ Iron Age 24 July 1890: 136.
  20. ^ "Old Gym". U. Grant Miller Library Digital Archives. Washington & Jefferson College.
  21. ^ Woodward, William McKenzie. Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources. Providence: Rhode Island Historical Preservation Commission, 1986.
  22. ^ Engineering Record 1 Sept. 1894: 226.
  23. ^ Engineering News 6 May 1896: 167.
  24. ^ Engineering News 14 July 1898: 12.
  25. ^ American Architect and Building News 26 June 1906: xiv.
  26. ^ Manufacturers' Record 1 July 1909: 70.

External links[edit]