Arthur H. Hayes Jr.

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Arthur Hull Hayes, Jr. (July 18, 1933 – February 11, 2010) was an American pharmacologist, medical educator and administrator who served as Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) from 1981 to 1983.

Early life[edit]

Hayes was the son of Arthur Hayes Sr., and Florence Gruber Hayes. He has two sisters and one brother. His father was the president of CBS Radio.

Education[edit]

Arthur was a graduate of Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Elementary School, graduating in 1947. Around 1955, at the age of 21, Arthur received a bachelor's degree in philosophy from Santa Clara University. After turning 23, he traveled to Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar where he earned a degree in philosophy, politics, and economics. He earned his medical degree from Cornell University Medical School in 1964.[1]

Career[edit]

Following his internship, residency, and a two-year term services in the Army Medical Corps, he became an assistant professor of medicine and pharmacology at Cornell in 1968, and became a director of clinical pharmacology at the Pennsylvania State University Medical School in 1972.[1] He granted his approval for the use of the sugar substitute aspartame in dry foods and a tabletop sweetener.

Hayes was FDA Commissioner during the Chicago Tylenol murders in 1982, which caused nationwide alarm after seven people died after taking Extra-Strength Tylenol capsules which had been laced with potassium cyanide. Under Hayes' leadership, the government and the drug industry responded by developing the first federal regulations requiring tamper-evident packaging for all over-the-counter drugs.[1]

After leaving the FDA in 1983, he was dean and provost of New York Medical College and was named president of EM Pharmaceuticals Inc..

Death[edit]

Hayes died from leukemia on February 11, 2010 at the age of 76. He is survived by his wife, Barbara Anne Carey; a son, Arthur, two daughters, Lisa Hayes and Kathy Saracino; two sisters, Mary Ann Kelley and Florence Hayes; his brother, Joseph; and eight grandchildren.

References[edit]

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