Arthur LeBlanc

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Arthur Joseph LeBlanc

33rd Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia
Assumed office
June 28, 2017
MonarchElizabeth II
Governor General
PremierStephen McNeil
Preceded byJohn James Grant
Justice of the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia
In office
1998 – June 28, 2017
Nominated byJean Chrétien
Personal details
Born1943 (age 75–76)
West Arichat, Nova Scotia
Spouse(s)Rosemarie Patricia Lirette
Childrenthree sons
Alma materSt. Francis Xavier University
Dalhousie University
ProfessionLawyer, Judge

Arthur Joseph LeBlanc ONS QC (born 1943)[1] is the 33rd and current Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia.[2]

Early life and education[edit]

Born in West Arichat, Nova Scotia, LeBlanc attended St. Francis Xavier University, in 1964 with a Bachelor of Commerce Degree and also a Bachelor of Laws Degree from Dalhousie University in 1968. He was admitted to the bar in November 1968.[1]

Legal career[edit]

Justice LeBlanc practiced law for 25 years, He concentrated his practice in civil litigation. In 1983, Justice LeBlanc was appointed as Queen's Counsel.[1] In 1998, he was appointed as a Justice of the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia on the advice of Prime Minister of Canada Jean Chrétien[1]

As Lieutenant Governor[edit]

LeBlanc was appointed Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia on June 14, 2017, by Governor General of Canada David Lloyd Johnston on the Constitutional advice of Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau.[1] LeBlanc was sworn in on June 28, 2017.

Personal life[edit]

He is married to Rosemarie Patricia and together they have three sons.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Biographical Notes". Prime Minister of Canada's Office. June 14, 2017. Retrieved February 16, 2012.
  2. ^ "Prime Minister announces new Lieutenant Governor and new Territorial Commissioner". Prime Minister of Canada's Office. June 14, 2017. Retrieved June 14, 2017.
  3. ^ "His Honour's Biography". Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia. 17 July 2014. Retrieved 13 January 2018.
Order of precedence
Preceded by
Elizabeth II, Queen of Canada
Order of precedence in Nova Scotia
as of 2017
Succeeded by
Stephen McNeil, Premier of Nova Scotia