Arthur L. Andrews

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Arthur L. Andrews
Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Arthur L. Andrews
7th Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force (1981-1983)
Nickname(s) Bud
Born (1934-03-09)March 9, 1934
Boston, Massachusetts
Died October 26, 1996(1996-10-26) (aged 62)
Allegiance United States United States
Service/branch  United States Air Force
Years of service
  • 1953 - 1957
  • 1958 - 1983
  • (29 years)
Rank
Unit 497th Tactical Fighter Squadron
Battles/wars Vietnam War
Awards See below

Arthur L. "Bud" Andrews (March 9, 1934 – October 26, 1996) was the seventh Chief Master Sergeant appointed to the highest enlisted position in the United States Air Force.

Military career[edit]

Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Arthur L. "Bud" Andrews was adviser to United States Secretary of the Air Force Verne Orr and Chief of Staff of the Air Force General Charles A. Gabriel on matters concerning welfare, effective utilization and progress of the enlisted members of the Air Force. He was the seventh chief master sergeant appointed to this ultimate noncommissioned officer position.[1]

Chief Andrews was born in Boston where he attended Cathedral of Holy Cross, Bancroft and Rice Public Schools, and the English High School. He enlisted in the Air Force in January 1953 and completed basic training at Sampson Air Force Base, N.Y. His first assignment was to Keesler Air Force Base, Miss., in April 1953, where he began 12 years as an air policeman, including eight years as an investigator. After a short tour at Keesler, he was sent to Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, and then to French Morocco, North Africa. Returning to the United States 12 months later, he was assigned to Travis Air Force Base, Calif., until January 1957, when he was honorably discharged.

In April 1958 he re-enlisted and was sent to Homestead Air Force Base, Fla., for three months. Chief Andrews was then assigned to Naha Air Base, Okinawa. He returned to the United States, and went to Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., as an air police investigator. The chief returned to Okinawa in April 1965 as noncommissioned officer in charge of the law enforcement administration section at Kadena Air Base. He was later appointed noncommissioned officer in charge of protocol and then cross-trained into the first sergeant career field.

His first assignment as a first sergeant began with the 4576th Transportation Squadron at Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. Six months later he was assigned to the 497th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Ubon Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand. Following his return from Southeast Asia, he was assigned to the Defense Language Institute West Coast in Monterey, Calif. Two years later he received his second assignment to Southeast Asia at Cam Ranh Bay Air Base, South Vietnam, as first sergeant for the 483rd Organizational Maintenance Squadron.

In December 1971 the chief returned to Keesler and served initially with the 3385th Student Squadron and then with the 3392nd Student Squadron. While there he attended Class 73C of the Senior Noncommissioned Officer Academy at Gunter Air Force Station, Ala. Upon graduation he transferred to the 6594th Test Group at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii.

He was assigned to Headquarters Squadron Section at Hanscom Air Force Base, Mass., as the first sergeant from January 1976 to June 1977. Chief Andrews was then selected as senior enlisted adviser to the commander, electronic systems division at Hanscom. He became senior enlisted adviser to the commander, Air Force Systems Command, Andrews Air Force Base, Md., in May 1978. In 1981, he became Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force.

Awards and decorations[edit]

Personal decorations
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Width-44 scarlet ribbon with width-4 ultramarine blue stripe at center, surrounded by width-1 white stripes. Width-1 white stripes are at the edges.
Bronze Star Medal with bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Width-44 crimson ribbon with two width-8 white stripes at distance 4 from the edges.
Meritorious Service Medal with bronze oak leaf cluster
Joint Service Commendation Medal
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Commendation Medal with two bronze oak leaf clusters
Unit awards
Presidential Unit Citation
V
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with Valor device and bronze oak leaf cluster
Service awards
Silver oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Good Conduct Medal with silver oak leaf cluster and three bronze oak leaf clusters
Army Good Conduct Medal
Campaign and service medals
Bronze star
Width=44 scarlet ribbon with a central width-4 golden yellow stripe, flanked by pairs of width-1 scarlet, white, Old Glory blue, and white stripes
National Defense Service Medal with bronze service star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Vietnam Service Medal with three bronze service stars
Humanitarian Service Medal
Service, training, and marksmanship awards
Air Force Overseas Short Tour Service Ribbon
Air Force Overseas Long Tour Service Ribbon
Silver oak leaf cluster
Air Force Longevity Service Award with silver oak leaf cluster
NCO Professional Military Education Graduate Ribbon
Bronze star
Small Arms Expert Marksmanship Ribbon with bronze service star
Air Force Training Ribbon
Foreign awards
Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Award
Vietnam Campaign Medal
USAF Badges
SECURITY POLICE QUALIFICATION BADGE.png Senior Security Police Qualification Badge
AFPoliceBadge.jpg Air Force Security Forces Badge

Succession[edit]

Military offices
Preceded by
James M. McCoy
Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force
1981–1983
Succeeded by
Sam E. Parish

References[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Air Force document "Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Arthur "Bud" L. Andrews biography".