Artists Anonymous

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Artists Anonymous
Nationality German/British
Education Berlin University of the Arts
Notable work Apocalyptic Warriors, Virus, The fictitious blowing up of the Hamburger Bahnhof

Artists Anonymous are an art group based in Berlin and London.[1] They were founded in 2001 during their studies at Berlin University of the Arts (UdK) at the classes of Georg Baselitz and Stan Douglas. They finished studying in 2006, when Douglas was forced to leave the UdK.[2][not in citation given]

Since 2005 they have exhibited in different international galleries like Sommer Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv, Christian Ehrentraut, Berlin, Goff+Rosenthal, Berlin/NY.

In 2006, one of the big diptychs from the series Apocalyptic Warriors was bought by Charles Saatchi.

In 2007, instead of collaborating with art galleries, they converted an old garage space in London, Vyner Street[3][4] to a showroom and ran their own gallery.[5] During this time several of their works were sold to the Deutsche Bank Collection. By the end of 2007 the opening of their second space in Berlin,[6] Heidestrasse, followed, where one big installation (the gunslinger and other true stories) took place.

Since then a number of different shows and project took place such as:

In 2009, Artists Anonymous ended their working relationship with Haunch of Venison to work with Riflemaker Gallery, London.[8]

Their work is included in various private and public Collections: Manchester City Art Gallery, UK, Deutsche Bank Collection, Saatchi Collection, UK; Advaney Collection, NL, UK; Walsall Art Museum, UK; Rubell Collection, Miami, USA, Zabludowicz Collection, UK.

In September 2012, they held their first show with Banksy at Lazarides Gallery.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Abrahams, Charlotte (8 January 2014). "Artists Anonymous". Financial Times. Retrieved 3 May 2015. 
  2. ^ Walde, Gabriela (29 July 2006). "Flucht aus der Universität der Künste". Die Welt (in German). Retrieved 30 April 2015. 
  3. ^ Williams, Gilda (22 June 2007). "Artists Anonymous". Artforum International. Retrieved 1 May 2015 – via HighBeam Research. (Subscription required (help)). 
  4. ^ Perry, Grayson (10 January 2007). "In art, the drugs really don't work". Times. London. Retrieved 14 May 2015. (Subscription required (help)). 
  5. ^ "Exhibitions". AA Gallery. Retrieved 18 November 2009. 
  6. ^ Wiensowski, Ingeborg (30 June 2008). "Kunst: Radikale Freiheit". Spiegel Online (in German). Retrieved 14 May 2015. 
  7. ^ "Artists Anonymous Virus" (PDF). Artists Anonymous (Press release). Retrieved 2 May 2015. 
  8. ^ "Artists Anonymous: The Happy Show". Rifle Maker Gallery. Retrieved 2 May 2015. 
  9. ^ "Artists Anonymous at Rathbone Place". Lazarides. Retrieved 2 May 2015. 

External links[edit]