Arts Magazine

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Arts Magazine, April 1981

Arts Magazine was a monthly magazine devoted to fine art. It was established in 1926 and last published in 1992.

Originally titled The Art Digest, it was printed semi-monthly from October to May and monthly from June to September.[1] Its stated purpose was to provide complete coverage of arts exhibitions in America, collated from all relevant news sources.

Art Digest was later purchased by James N. Rosenberg and Jonathan Marshall (who would subsequently own and publish the Scottsdale Daily Progress newspaper). In 1955, the title was changed to ARTS. The word "Digest" was dropped (as explained by Marshall in the September 15, 1955 issue) due to newer features, design modernization, and a widening audience. "We realized that there was a great need in this country for a serious art magazine to serve the growing public," the announcement stated. "Perhaps," he continued, "the best description of our editorial aims in the new ARTS can be found in the words interesting, unbiased, and authoritative."[2] Contributors to that issue included J.P. Hodin, Martica Sawin, Robert Rosenblum, Ada Louise Huxtable, and Dore Ashton, whose article "What is 'avant-garde'?" was the feature essay.

The publication was finally named Arts Magazine after Marshall and Rosenberg sold it in 1958. Regular contributors at the time included Donald Judd, Helen De Mott, Sidney Tillim, Annette Michelson, Michael Fried, Lawrence Alloway, Jan Butterfield, and April Kingsley.

The magazine's offices were in New York City and it was last published by Art Digest, Co.[3] The magazine was glossy and priced at $4.00 a copy in 1981. The April 1981 issue (see photo) had a cover story called "Gertrude Greene: Constructions of the 1930s and 1940s", written by Jacqueline Moss.

The last issue to reach subscribers was March 1992, featuring Alexandra Anderson-Spivy on artist Rackstraw Downes and Annie Sprinkle on Jeff Koons. The April issue was published but never mailed. Editors at the time[4] included Dore Ashton, Jerry Saltz, Barry Schwabsky, Jeremy Gilbert-Rolfe, Peter Selz, John Yau, Elizabeth Frank, and Jeanne Siegel.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Art Digest Archived August 9, 2011, at the Wayback Machine., Steiner Agency. Retrieved November 6, 2011.
  2. ^ Marshall, Jonathan (September 15, 1955). "Arts Digest": 5.
  3. ^ Arts Magazine, WorldCat. Retrieved November 5, 2011.
  4. ^ "Masthead". Arts Magazine. March 1992.

External links[edit]